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Coffee Chick Web I’ll try this. Steep a full pound of coarsely ground coffee in 9 cups of cold water in a sort of plastic pail and allow the “mulch” to soak for 12 hours. With the pull of a plug, a thickish coffee syrup drains through a filter into a glass carafe which you then store in the refrigerator. When you want coffee, you measure some into your mug and add hot water or milk. Link.

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


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Comments

  1. BillCoderre says:

    Link has expired.

    Most of these “cold press” brewers are a special-purpose jug with a specially designed filter on the bottom.

    Pontificating, I see the only difficult part would be the straining. To do that, I suggest a “Chinois” conical strainer and a wooden pestle.

    This strainer is incredibly useful for tasks like steeping fruit in liquor, or making stock from bones or scraps, because the cone means that you get a LOT of surface area, so the liquid comes through quickly. Then you use the wooden pestle to press the remaining stuff to get the last bits of good liquid out of the used-up stuff.

    However, chinoises are expensive (you can find a good cheap one for $35, and the usual one is $70), so the other choice is to first pour off as much liquid as possible, then put the grounds into a fabric bag (cheesecloth, muslin, pantyhose) and squeeze out the liquid from the grounds.

    Or line a regular strainer with a couple of layers of cheesecloth.

    Or use a “gold” coffee filter and process the grounds a bit at a time.

    I wouldn’t use paper for this task, because the liquid will evaporate faster than it drips through. And I’m only kidding a little.

    In any case, squeeze out as much liquid as possible.

  2. BillCoderre says:

    Link has expired.

    Most of these “cold press” brewers are a special-purpose jug with a specially designed filter on the bottom.

    Pontificating, I see the only difficult part would be the straining. To do that, I suggest a “Chinois” conical strainer and a wooden pestle.

    This strainer is incredibly useful for tasks like steeping fruit in liquor, or making stock from bones or scraps, because the cone means that you get a LOT of surface area, so the liquid comes through quickly. Then you use the wooden pestle to press the remaining stuff to get the last bits of good liquid out of the used-up stuff.

    However, chinoises are expensive (you can find a good cheap one for $35, and the usual one is $70), so the other choice is to first pour off as much liquid as possible, then put the grounds into a fabric bag (cheesecloth, muslin, pantyhose) and squeeze out the liquid from the grounds.

    Or line a regular strainer with a couple of layers of cheesecloth.

    Or use a “gold” coffee filter and process the grounds a bit at a time.

    I wouldn’t use paper for this task, because the liquid will evaporate faster than it drips through. And I’m only kidding a little.

    In any case, squeeze out as much liquid as possible.

  3. Marilyn Lee says:

    This process makes wonderful coffee! Straining is the difficulty. What brands of coffee are you using? I have been using Starbucks Espresso French Press grind and it is expennnnnnnnnnnnnsize! Any other suggestions?
    I am using the large gold filter until I can find a better way.
    Any suggestions are welcome and thanks!

  4. Marilyn Lee says:

    This process makes wonderful coffee! Straining is the difficulty. What brands of coffee are you using? I have been using Starbucks Espresso French Press grind and it is expennnnnnnnnnnnnsize! Any other suggestions?
    I am using the large gold filter until I can find a better way.
    Any suggestions are welcome and thanks!