Subscribe to Make Magazine Today!

Images-136 Here’s an amazing video of a Michigan guy named Wally Wallington (really!) who thinks he’s cracked the method which was used to build Stonehenge. In the video he stand a 19 ton monolith upright by himself using nothing but wood, some rocks, sand, and a hose. It’s some really freakin’ amazing stuff! Oh, and he also uses a variation of his technique to move a pole barn by himeself over 300 feet! [via] Link.


  • peteredworthy

    The link seems wrong, it should be:
    http://www.theforgottentechnology.com/

  • BrK

    Now we also know why the ancient construction technologies died, they weren’t properly documented. There is a certain irony in the fact that this guy seems to want to recover lost knowledge, yet he can’t produce a cross-browser compatible webpage. I had to go through some minor view-source, copy/paste contortions to see his videos, due to the fact that the pages don’t seem Mozilla friendly.

    I (seriously) wonder if something similar happened many years ago? I have heard all kinds of stories of crusaders destroying Egyptian knowledge stores, etc… But I wonder if it was “encoded” in a less proprietary format would it have survived?

  • thinkythings.org

    Building Stonehenge on a smaller scale: http://www.thinkythings.org/odd-things/foamhenge.html.

  • SmartAZ

    The old methods were usually not recorded at all, just because they were so obvious. People simply did what they could see needed to be done.

    I have seen pictures of men moving a large stone somewhere in the middle east. It weighed about a hundred tons and they used a few hundred men with timbers and pulleys. The hoists were simple tripods of heavy timbers. They put timbers under the stone and hoists on both sides, about 3 feet or so apart, and lifted it off the ground. They then attached each hoist to the timber behind it. By pulling on the ropes the stone was moved forward about three feet, the distance between hoists. The crew in back would then carry their hoists to the front. They could move it at the speed of a slow walk. It looked like a great stone centipede.

  • stonehengegeek

    check out http://www.stonehenge.com to see a really cool pocket watch designed as a replica of stonehenge.