Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!

060403-5
The Ministry of the Environment Government of Japan has a guide (PDF) on using cloth as opposed to paper for wrapping gifts to cut down on the wasted paper usually used in gift wrap, great idea – Link.

Thanks Lil!

Related:

  • Stitch and hem gift bags – Link.

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


Related

Comments

  1. brlittle says:

    We’ve been using cloth giftwrap here in the States for years, but we do it a little differently. Typically, we’ll hit Wal-Mart, Ben Franklin Crafts, Hancock Fabrics and similar places for good deals on Christmas fabric the day after Christmas. Then over the year we’ll sew a variety of bags, large and small, out of it. They range from simple three-sides-topped-with-rickrack jobs to large, tunneled ones with drawstrings and toggles and such.

    The year my daughter was adopted from China, we used a semi-pricey imported Chinese brocade in red and gold, which was a big hit. It’s extra work, but it looks really good under the tree. :)

    1. Furoshiki says:

      A lot of people think you need to buy Furoshiki but you really can just make them yourself. It’s just cloth!

  2. onlyocelot says:

    So where can we get them in the US? Failing that, what are the ‘right’ dimensions and cloth textures according to the tradition?

  3. onlyocelot says:

    OK, answer my own question…

    A web search shows (where I can actually read the dimensions) a couple of sizes. Whether traditional or nouveau, I have no idea.
    18″ x 18″
    19.5″ square
    27″ square
    41.3″ square

    I am guessing that traditionally, they are made, not bought, and they are sized according to what is needed to properly cover the gift or package.

    I was not able to find anything that actually addressed how edges are finished.

  4. brlittle says:

    You could finish the edges with a simple hem and it would look fine.

  5. mwproductions says:

    In Honolulu, you can buy it at Shirokiya. I’ll bet you can get it at Uwajimaya in Seattle. Now all I need to do is find a place in Spokane that sells it…