Nat Sewingmachine

A few of us from the CRAFT and MAKE team have volunteered to show off our sewing machines and tell you why we like ’em and how we use them.

This is my sewing machine, a computerized Euro-Pro 9120 I bought this back in 2001 for around $499. I had a mid-range Singer before (and still have that) but as a gadget girl at heart, I wanted all the cool computerized functions for embroidery and stitches to play with, but wasn’t looking to shell out over $1000. This sewing machine also looks like the old iMacs with it’s clear blue flip lid top. Maybe that’s why it was calling to me? I love the programmed stitches though. There’s about 300 and you can program it to remember up to 100 settings. My favorites are not just the type (only an Arial style and a script style font), it can also embroider fun borders like hearts, flowers, curly circle shapes and more. Everything works well on this machine and nothing has ever broken. I’ve sewn thick jean material to light silk and its’ worked with all fabric perfectly. My one annoyance is that it beeps everytime you take your foot off the pedal, but I’ve really gotten used to it by now. Heidi Kenny of My Paper Crane had the same issue. I’ve made a lot of things on this machine everything from making a skirt or totebag to hemming pants. I am in the market to upgrade from this to a better machine possibly one where you can attach a laptop to in order to do custom designs, but I’m in no rush. This sewing machine continues to serve me well for my craft projects. Link.

Arwen Sewingmachine


Arwen O’Reilly, Staff Editor

My parents got me this portable Singer at an antique store when I graduated from college because I was moving around so much. It drops right into this little carrying case with all the attachments and the original instruction booklet. I love it because it’s absolutely gorgeous (who wouldn’t love the gleaming black metal with gold lettering?) but also because it’s so old-fashioned. It’s electric, but otherwise so simple I’ve been able to figure out how to fix it every time something’s gone wrong (which isn’t often). Plus I like the idea that I’m somehow connected to the people who owned it before me. It’s in great condition, so they must have loved it, too. Link.

Terrie Sewingmachine

Terrie Miller, Online Manager

This is a teeny sewing machine, the Euro-Pro Shark. I bought mine at Target for around $20-30, and they’re available on Amazon, too. It was perfect for doing some simple sewing to make a dog bed. I had every expectation that I’d return the thing, but I decided to try it before buying something more expensive, and I’m glad I did. I thought I’d need to bungee-cord it down to the desk to keep it from moving around, but it worked just fine. It only does simple stitching, but for sewing parts of projects for someone who doesn’t plan on doing lots of fabric work, it’s been great. Link.

Bre Sewingmachine

Bre Pettis, Media Maker

I love my old singer. It’s a hand me down from my step-grandma and it’s been through a lot and if something ever breaks, which has never happened, I could just go to the goodwill, buy another for 20 bucks and be good to go. I had a second one as a backup for a while, but never used it so I gave it away. It can be a bit fussy if I don’t get the bobbin tension right, but I made a few hundred rag dolls and hand puppets on this thing to support myself as an artist back in the day and it shows no wear. This one has all the bells and whistles and there are a bunch of pattern disks available, but I gave those away since I never used them. I took it apart once to see how it works and there is actually quite a bit of clever mechanics in this thing. Link.