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Householdlead8
If you’re giving toys to kids over the holidays you might want to consider getting this LeadCheck kit, one quick swap and you’ll know if you’ll see that toy on the recall list later – Link.


  • MrCrumley

    As a parent who’s been freaked out by all the lead-toys news, I considered getting some kits like these. However, I read this notice from the Prod. Safety Commission that claims these type of kits are pretty unreliable: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml08/08038.html

    Apparently, the at-home kits are designed for use on house paint, for which the allowable lead limit is higher than the limit for lead in toys. The best lead testing method is using XRF detectors (which start at about $2,000 on ebay, FYI).

    Darn you China! I love your cheap stuff, but why must you poison our children with lead?

  • skab

    ~This is just some ignorant fool speaking, but what happend to the days of:
    melting down fishing weights,
    made from lead,
    and pouring them into molds to make little lead army
    men that were then painted with lead paint.
    I can understand not wanting the real young ones to play with this stuff, and it’s good to know that there’s lead in it. Sometimes I just don’t understand why we can’t just teach them to wash their hands and not put things in their mouths.

  • AndrewZela

    I found that http://www.leadtoyrecalls.com is a good resource. It has the latest recalsl by email and also a guide to buying safe toys.

  • tercüme

    Apparently, the at-home kits are designed for use on house paint, for which the allowable lead limit is higher than the limit for lead in toys. The best lead testing method is using XRF detectors (which start at about $2,000 on ebay, FYI).

  • çeviri

    Apparently, the at-home kits are designed for use on house paint, for which the allowable lead limit is higher than the limit for lead in toys. The best lead testing method is using XRF detectors (which start at about $2,000 on ebay, FYI).