Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!

DIY_capo.jpg

A guitar capo is one of those items you look at in the store and think – “I could make one of those, why should I buy one?”. Well in case you haven’t gotten around to it yet, here’s a couple how-tos to show you, um . . . how-to.

  • The simple approach – pencil and rubber band -Link
  • The slightly more sturdy approach – marker, stretch bracelets -Link
  • The heavier duty approach (pictured above) – wood, foam, rubber, misc. hardware -Link

    Don’t forget – you can also make your own slide cylinder for those twangy solos -Link

    Related:
    DIY Slide Guitar
    Make a 3 string slide guitar out of junk -Link

    Collin Cunningham

    Born, drew a lot, made video, made music on 4-track, then computer, more songwriting, met future wife, went to art school for video major, made websites, toured in a band, worked as web media tech, discovered electronics, taught myself electronics, blogged about DIY electronics, made web videos about electronics and made music for them … and I still do!


    Related
  • Comments

    1. soapdish says:

      Or you could spend $5 and have something that’s actually functional. Your choice.

    2. bayne says:

      Those cheaper capos wear out really fast.I agree with “if you can make it why buy it?”

    3. Volkemon says:

      I am a guitar player and have yet to wear out a capo. They are a clamp on/clamp off (sorry clapper!) type of device. My last cost me $4.95 in 199? and still works fine.(I never took the price tag off it.:) )
      There are far better uses for my time, maybe not yours…it’s like the sandblaster post- it’s news to someone. And we have to remember there are ALWAYS beginners out there. This project may launch another MAKEr.

    4. failrate says:

      Heh, this reminds me: I made a two-string cigar box guitar for a friend of mine who uses a capo alot. I didn’t know if a capo would work, so I rigged one up by notching two ends of a segment of bamboo skewer (quickly becoming a contemporary of duct tape and WD-40 for ubiquity and utility), and using some thick, soft cord to wrap around the skewers in the channels I notched, around the tiny neck of the cigar box guit’, and back around to the other notch. A relatively simple knot allows me to tighten with a pull. Works a treat.

      So, less than five dollars in less than five minutes :D