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Enclosurehelp

Sparkfun has a some helpful tips for casing up electronics projects – good tips for board and switch mounting specifically.

One thing to keep in mind during all of this: as in all things, there will be a lot of back and forth when you find a box that you think might work, then something else interferes (ie, the height of your power jack). Keep your patience near by because it’ll be easier to work through the numbers now as apposed to later when you have a box in hand with a few holes in it and your unit wont fit.

Boxing it up

Collin Cunningham

Born, drew a lot, made video, made music on 4-track, then computer, more songwriting, met future wife, went to art school for video major, made websites, toured in a band, worked as web media tech, discovered electronics, taught myself electronics, blogged about DIY electronics, made web videos about electronics and made music for them … and I still do!


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Comments

  1. Anony Moose says:

    I am a big advocate of good old fashioned hand tools. Put away the Dremel — for working in plastic, it’s more trouble than it’s worth. I have seen many projects on the internet that have been butchered with a Dremel that would have been far better if executed with a little patience and skill with hand tools.

    A good start is a mixture of different files (different cuts, sizes and profiles), a hack saw and a coping saw.

    Using the rectangular switch cut-out as an example:

    1. Mark the cut-out with something that will give a crisp, clean line. Use a ruler to mark straight lines.

    2. Use a drill to drill out the corners, and shown in the article. Leave some extra meat between the edge of the holes, and your lines. It’s easy to file material away. It’s impossible to put it back.

    3. Use a coping saw, or broken hacksaw blade to cut the straights. Again, stay within the lines.

    4. Carefully file the remaining material away.

    It takes more time, but the process is more satisfying than using a screaming Dremel with a grabby cutter, and bathing in ABS or polystyrene fumes. You will also be impressed with the results.

  2. Collin Cunningham says:

    Thank you – that sounds like an excellent alternative.
    Somehow I never acquired a coping saw – now I must!