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Rule Organ
From the MAKE Flickr photo pool

Steven Goodwin shares tips and measurements for making the perfect study hall instrument -

If there’s one piece of science that every kid knows, it’s that twanging a ruler on the edge of the desk makes a noise, and by changing the amount of overhang will change the pitch. Give anyone a new ruler, and the first thing they’ll do is twang it, to see how it sounds. This is an interesting fact of life.
[…]
So, to bring an element of fun back to the proceedings, we can combine these facts to build a very simple ‘rule organ’. By taping thirteen rulers to a nearby desk, each with a different amount of overhang, we have a rudimentary musical (?!?!?!?) instrument. So, how much overhang is necessary, and how do we do it?

Head over to his site for the specifics – Rule Organ

- The Rule Organ on Flickr

Collin Cunningham

Born, drew a lot, made video, made music on 4-track, then computer, more songwriting, met future wife, went to art school for video major, made websites, toured in a band, worked as web media tech, discovered electronics, taught myself electronics, blogged about DIY electronics, made web videos about electronics and made music for them … and I still do!


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Comments

  1. Joel Kirchartz says:

    While skimming this for the basics … I saw him talking about letting the rulers overhang by x ammount of millimeters, and the gap between the edge and the marking.

    The first question I asked myself is: How does he know how far each one is hanging … then I realized He’s using 13 perfectly good rulers.

    c’est la vie … Make = The Best.

  2. Tony Bullard says:

    This is pretty much just evil to post something like this without video or audio. I challenge you to find one person who read this article that didn’t want to hear what it sounds like.

  3. Vincent says:

    that’s weird because i was too lazy to build an instrument for my Science class last year so i did something similar to this

  4. steveburnett says:

    Daxophones are elaborate carved wooden strips cut for different sounds.

    http://www.efi.group.shef.ac.uk/photos/idax.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daxophone

    I first found out about daxophones in the audio collection and book _Gravikords, Whirligigs, and Pyrophones_.

  5. Steev says:

    (from the bottom of the page)