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Curbly has a nice video how-to on building a modern inspired birdhouse. The final product looks a lot nicer than most versions found in the local hardware store. Hopefully your local birds will appreciate the design.

Anyone interested in design and architecture can appreciate the brilliant combination of modern materials and contemporary lifestyle patterns inhabitated in the classic mid-century modern ranch home. But rare is the lucky individual that’ll every live in an Eichler or an iconic Case Study House. Heck, most of us will never even live in California.

Read more about making a Mid-Century Modern Birdhouse

Marc de Vinck

I’m currently working full time as the Dexter F. Baker Professor of Practice in Creativity in the Masters of Engineering in Technical Entrepreneurship Program at Lehigh University. I’m also an avid product designer, kit maker, author, father, tinkerer, and member of the MAKE Technical Advisory board.


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Comments

  1. Birdy says:

    As a designer, it pains me to see other designers, or in this case, probably an architect, get favorable publicity for a design that looks pretty, but makes no practical sense.

    Fifteen minutes of reading on the web is enough to inform anyone that plywood is not a good material, because it more than likely emits formaldehyde, and has a smooth surface.

    A good birdhouse, according to the experts, is rough inside, so the birds can, er, climb the walls, and has -no- perch for predators to climb on. This one has both a ledge, and a “carport” for varmints to lay in wait, licking their sharp little teeth while they anticipate dinner’s arrival.

    Also, there is no evidence of ventilation. Roasted sparrow, anyone? The maker did mention cleaning, after he glued his together. Sigh. It’s so typical of architects to get married to a material, a form, and rush ahead with no regard for practicality!

    These people are designing buildings that inflict damage on their occupants for generations! Kudos to the very few who do understand that their work is about far more than “making a statement.” Shame on those make, and reward pretty ideas that don’t work!

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