Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!


Adrian from Google has an overview of the latest SketchUp, he writes -

We’re very excited to announce the new release of Google SketchUp 7. If you don’t already know about the fun you can have with SketchUp, here’s a quick recap:

SketchUp is software you can use to build 3D models of anything: your house, killer robots, furniture, trees, abstract art — anything. Architects and engineers use it to design buildings and other structures. Woodworkers use it to plan their projects. And lots of people use it to figure out where to put their furniture. SketchUp is easy to learn, it comes in free and Pro versions, and it’s more fun than a houseful of clowns. Oh, and you can use it to build models for Google Earth, too.

So what’s new in SketchUp 7? There’s too much to list here, but we focused on three major areas for this release:

Making it even easier to get started – We’ve created a new class of “smart” objects called Dynamic Components, which are simpler to work with for new modelers. Take a look at this video to see what I mean:

Making it easier to share what you make and collaborate with other people – We built a better link between SketchUp and the rest of the 3D world, made it possible to “sign” your models, and added Google Docs–style collaboration and sharing to our 3D Warehouse.

Adding powerful features for experienced SketchUp Pro users – SketchUp is only half of the SketchUp Pro suite; the other half is all about sharing your work with your clients. LayOut 2 (which is now officially out of beta and rarin’ to go) lets you create multi-page documents and presentations. Your models are linked to your LayOut file so that changing the former automatically updates the latter.

Take a look at the What’s New in 7 page on the SketchUp website to get the whole scoop. There’s a great video to watch, and it stars some of the more prone-to-sunlight members of our engineering team — in lab coats, no less. Don’t miss it.

There’s a detailed list at their “What’s new” page too – it looks like a great update!

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


Related

Comments

  1. srakkt says:

    It’s two thousand freaking eight.

    And no Linux/Unix version? Sorry, I thought Google was a technology company.

  2. Phillip Torrone says:

    google reads all this, so i’m sure they’re going to put this in the request list.

  3. Anonymous says:

    “Release a version for Linux” (and MacOS) is usually on the bug list long before Google products are even released. Most Google engineers use Linux, and want Google apps running on Linux, so not having a Linux version isn’t an oversight, just a matter of priorities.

  4. srakkt says:

    Much of the reason there’s no Linux variant has to do with how SketchUp came to be; @Last was a Windows dev shop, and insofar as I understand it (which may be completely wrong) it’s all the same folks still hacking the same codebase, just employed by Big G.

  5. Dan Kegel says:

    http://wiki.winehq.org/GoogleSketchup explains how to get past the initial couple problems. It’s working well for me on wine-1.1.8 with a good Nvidia card. Your milage may vary.
    Be sure to report any new problems you find so we can try to fix them!

    (Disclaimer: I’m a google engineer who has worked on Wine in the past. My current project is the Chrome Linux port. My first job out of college was to do a 3D graphics package in PLM-86 (!) for a CAD outfit called Perspective, Inc., but I’m generally ignorant about CAD. So I can’t really find the interesting Sketchup bugs myself. Real users who report bugs and tell the Wine developers how to repeat them are heroes in my book…)