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DIY Navy – Oberon Class Submarine for sale – I bet those pirates might pick this up on the cheap…

The Otama is a decommissioned Australian RAN Oberon class submarine of 2030 tons displacement surfaced.Apart from the removal of classified communications and sensor equipment, OTAMA is in the same state that the crew left it, an operational Oberon class submarine, with a full outfit of spares and equipment.

MOE_submarine_cover
MOE_submarine
MADE ON EARTH: Erik and the Submarine
Photography by Andreas Nilsson
makezine.com/go/eriksub From the column Made on EarthMAKE 13, page 23 – Johanna Hallin.

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


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Comments

  1. Scott Saunders says:

    “When I first started building, I looked around for tion of a Neanderthal computer mouse on his list information, but there wasn’t a lot out there, since of merits. submarines are mostly classified as military.”

    The submarine article text is absolutely beautiful. It reminds me or Surrealist poetry. I think perhaps someone merged two columns of text together.

  2. ignatz says:

    Was this written drunk?
    Or by a confused robot?
    Liked it either way

  3. gawaine says:

    I don’t know what Look out! A giant
    you guys are complaining moose! It’s about to
    about. It’s all perfectly attack. Call the
    clear to me. Governor.

  4. iprefermuffins says:

    Erik Westerberg was 5 years old when he first saw a large oil tank standing next to a neighbor’s barn in his rural hometown in northern Sweden. “I started dreaming of a submarine,” he remembers. “I wanted so badly to see what was down there.”

    The underwater world still calls to him, but the construction itself is now the biggest driving force. “When I first started building, I looked around for information, but there wasn’t a lot out there, since submarines are mostly classified as military. So I gave up. I decided to build it completely from my own imagination and common sense.”

    For the past two years Westerberg, 26, has spent more than 2,400 hours, apart from his day job as a freelance mechanic, building his submarine. He had to invent a special device to bend the 30-millimeter, matte-finish sheet metal for his 6-meter-long hull. He used 200 kilos of filler metals in welding, and thought out all the tiniest details — from the Volvo seat and racer steering wheel down to the smallest, well-oiled mechanical bearing.

    [still missing something here?]

    tons and can dive to a depth of 100 meters. Down in the dark waters of the Gulf of Bothnia, the submarine is powered by an electric motor from a lathe, giving a modest top speed of 2.5 knots. Westerberg’s submarine is only the second civil submarine in Sweden. The first was built in the 1960s by HÃ¥kan Lans, who can also claim the invention of a Neanderthal computer mouse on his list of merits.

    But there are other submarines in Swedish history. In October 1981 the Soviet submarine U137, armed with nuclear torpedoes, ran aground in the Swedish archipelago, and for many years holidaymaking Swedes, wearing Speedos and sunscreen, kept a wary eye on the horizon.

    “It would be funny to put the hammer and sickle on the sub,” Westerberg says laughing. “Then there could be a little action when I’m out and about.”

  5. Kirt says:

    I had to preserve the original text of this story (in case it is edited later). It’s just priceless, surreal and poetic weirdness on an epic scale. :)

    ————————————-
    MADE ON EARTH: Erik and the Submarine
    Photography by Andreas Nilsson

    Erik Westerberg was 5 years old when he first saw tons and can dive to a depth of 100 meters. Down a large oil tank standing next to a neighbor’s barn in in the dark waters of the Gulf of Bothnia, the sub-his rural hometown in northern Sweden. “I started marine is powered by an electric motor from a dreaming of a submarine,” he remembers. “I wanted lathe, giving a modest top speed of 2. 5 knots. so badly to see what was down there.” Westerberg’s submarine is only the second civil The underwater world still calls to him, but the submarine in Sweden. The first was built in the construction itself is now the biggest driving force. 1960s by HÃ¥kan Lans, who can also claim the inven- “When I first started building, I looked around for tion of a Neanderthal computer mouse on his list information, but there wasn’t a lot out there, since of merits. submarines are mostly classified as military. So But there are other submarines in Swedish history. I gave up. I decided to build it completely from my In October 1981 the Soviet submarine U137, armed own imagination and common sense.” with nuclear torpedoes, ran aground in the Swedish For the past two years Westerberg, 26, has spent archipelago, and for many years holidaymaking more than 2,400 hours, apart from his day job as a Swedes, wearing Speedos and sunscreen, kept a freelance mechanic, building his submarine. He had wary eye on the horizon. to invent a special device to bend the 30-millimeter, “It would be funny to put the hammer and sickle matte-finish sheet metal for his 6-meter-long hull. on the sub,” Westerberg says laughing. “Then there He used 200 kilos of filler metals in welding, and could be a little action when I’m out and about.” thought out all the tiniest details — from the Volvo seat and racer steering wheel down to the smallest, well-oiled mechanical bearing.

  6. Simon says:

    Bork! Bork! Bork!

    It’s worth commenting on the first part of this story and mention there is an Oberon class submarine (HMAS Onslow) at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Darling Harbour in Sydney. Well worth going to take a look at.

  7. Simon says:

    Bork! Bork! Bork!

    It’s worth commenting on the first part of this story and mention there is an Oberon class submarine (HMAS Onslow) at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Darling Harbour in Sydney. Well worth going to take a look at.

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