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Berkeley shop adapts bikes for any disability

The problem: Cycles are factory-made for people with a wide variety of physical disabilities, but there is no solo bike made for a person with no use of her arms.

The problem with that problem: Greg Milano, BORP director of cycling and the man who dreamed up the concept of the Adaptive Cycling Center, doesn’t see problems as problems.

Milano and Martin Greiner, one of the bike house’s 30 or so regular volunteers, went to work. They pondered, puttered and pounded, and pieced together a three-wheeled bike on which the rider performs all functions – pedaling, braking, turning, gear-shifting – with her legs.

Meida came to the Cycling Center and rode off down the trail with friends. Alone. Free.

The bike house is unique. There are other adaptive cycling centers in the country, but very few offer the element of independent-use, drop-in riding, as opposed to organized and scheduled group activities. And probably no other such center has a variety of bikes equal to the bike house fleet.