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Kiteman has a very romantic Instructable on collecting real-life fallen stars – meteorites.

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Comments

  1. simon says:

    I had heard of collecting micrometeorites years ago but have never gotten around to trying it. I could never figure out how you tell what you have actually is from space and not just pollution but examining it under a microscope makes perfect sense (and I have one now).

    I wonder if you could also collect them using some kind of rain gauge type arrangement? Perhaps some kind of funnel draining into a tube with magnets around it to catch the particles while everything else gets washed through?

  2. Patti Schiendelman says:

    @simon, that’s a neat idea. Check out the comments on the Instructable, there’s lots of technique discussion there. :)

  3. Simon says:

    I shall have to be very careful where I try to collect them from. I am restoring an old car in my garage which has had a lot of grinding/stripping/welding etc done on it. Lots of metal particles floating about at my place!

    What is need is a fountain or pond in the middle of nowhere! My parents do collect all the rainwater off their roof to use on their garden. I could go fishing with magnets in their collection tank I guess.