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SD Times Blog says Google might be working on their own router-

For a long time now, Juniper has had one big ol’ customer floating its bottom line: Google. It makes sense, as Juniper specializes in gigantically powerful boxes for routing traffic, and Google exists as one giant pool of information in a constant state of flux. Both incoming and outgoing, it’s hard to imagine a world where Google isn’t the absolute largest generator of traffic on the Internet, no matter what all the monitoring agencies say.

But all of that is going to change soon. According to multiple sources, including one inside Cisco, Google is working on its own router.

Since we are doing “alt.CES” this week, I’d like to propose the following to Google – make the best router design in the world, then make it an open source hardware project – let anyone compete on bringing the hardware to market and adding new features to the design, provided they share it back, it’s open source hardware so commercial use is fine. Google benefited a lot from the open source software world, it would be very bold and very cool to have an open source hardware router designed (at first) by Google. Once it’s released, may the best made, most cost effective one win in marketplace.

Here’s post from Lifehacker about an open source firmware project for routers right now… Turn your $60 router into a $600 router. Adam wrote…

Of all the great DIY projects at this year’s Maker Faire, the one project that really caught my eye involved converting a regular old $60 router into a powerful, highly configurable $600 router. The router has an interesting history, but all you really need to know is that the special sauce lies in embedding Linux in your router. I found this project especially attractive because: 1) It’s easy, and 2) it’s totally free. So when I got the chance, I dove into converting my own router. After a relatively simple firmware upgrade, you can boost your wireless signal, prioritize what programs get your precious bandwidth, and do lots of other simple or potentially much more complicated things to improve your computing experience. Today I’m going to walk you through upgrading your router’s firmware to the powerful open source DD-WRT firmware.

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


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