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Pennyheatsinks

In order to investigate the effectiveness of non-traditional heatsinks on the TO-220 component package, Warren tested out several approaches with pennies and even a paperclip.

In a recent thread on Head-Fi, someone asked how well a paperclip would work for heat-sinking a TO-220 part. Much speculation ensued (much of it from your humble author), including opinions that a penny might work better, and then the argument moved on to exactly how to use the penny and so on. I eventually decided that experimentation was called for, which lead to this article.

Perhaps surpisingly, the paperclip proved mightier than a single pennny. Read the detailed results of further testing – DIY Heat Sinks [via Hacked Gadgets]

Collin Cunningham

Born, drew a lot, made video, made music on 4-track, then computer, more songwriting, met future wife, went to art school for video major, made websites, toured in a band, worked as web media tech, discovered electronics, taught myself electronics, blogged about DIY electronics, made web videos about electronics and made music for them … and I still do!


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Comments

  1. vivi says:

    Interestingly the paper clip does better than the penny. As someone said on hackedgadgets a penny does not add much surface to dissipate heat. I sometimes use metal paper clamps to cool regulators or transistors on breadboards or while debugging designs, with relative success.

  2. BigD145 says:

    Those pennies look fairly new. If you want to use pennies because you think they are copper, then use some copper pennies and not the zinc ones we have now.

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