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Automata artist Dug North has posted a round-up of books related to gear-making and is looking for suggestions for others.

After seeing the beautiful use of gears in Bill Durovchic’s kinetic sculpture, I started looking for books on gears. The following books all look good and get great ratings from Amazon’s vast customer base.

Additional suggestions are welcome!

Handbook of Practical Gear DesignHandbook of Practical Gear Design (Mechanical Engineering, CRC Press Hardcover)
by Darle W. Dudley

Product Description from Amazon: “For more than 30 years the book Practical Gear Design, later re-titled Handbook of Practical Gear Design, has been the leading engineering guide and reference on the subject. It is now available again in its most recent edition. The book is a detailed, practical guide and reference to gear technology. The design of all types of gears is covered, from those for small mechanisms to large industrial applications.”

List of books on gear design and fabrication

More:

Gareth Branwyn

Gareth Branwyn is a freelancer writer and the former Editorial Director of Maker Media. He is the author or editor of a dozen books on technology, DIY, and geek culture, including the first book about the web (Mosaic Quick Tour) and the Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Building Robots. He is currently working on a best-of collection of his writing, called Borg Like Me.


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Comments

  1. PC Paul says:

    I have an idea for which I need a small but complex gearbox – involving planetary gears, concentric shafts etc.

    Is there anything I can use to model the physical design, but also to apply various input speeds and watch the effect on the various outputs, so I can get the design right before trying to build it?

    I’m not heavily into CAD, but I’ve used it various programs a few times. It’s the dynamic modelling that I can’t find anywhere.

    Thanks
    Paul

    1. Curtisbeef says:

      Ya Try out SolidWorks if you can get you hands on a copy( wink wink ). Its amazing for mocking up Mechanical devices and testing them out. Slight learning curve but after a few hours you get the hang of it even if you have never used a CAD type program before.

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