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[Photo from Park Tools]

Mike writes in the comments:

It’s good to learn how to maintain anything that you use and bicycles are one of those few things that people own that you can still do this with only $100 worth of tools.

One of the best websites I’ve found for bicycle maintenance is on the Park Tools website. They have guides for doing lots and lots of things, and how to do them properly.

Indeed, this seems like a good resource. All the repair how-tos have a printable version that pops up, giving you a way to keep your keyboard clean during your bike repair projects. It might even make sense to print a copy of the most used repairs in your shop and keep them in page protectors, handy near the bench for quick reference. The tool list is worth checking out, too.

From their Home Mechanic Tool Lists page:

Maintaining your own bike can be fun, but it can also be confusing at times to know which tools you will need to perform the service you want. Below are a series of recommended tool lists for general maintenance of the average road or off-road bike. Attempt to develop two sets of tools- one for inside a seat bag for on-the-trail/road use, and another set for home use.

The page goes on to list a collection of tools, some of which they manufacture, others that you can pick up locally.

[Thanks Mike!]

Chris Connors

Making things is the best way to learn about our world.


Related

Comments

  1. Oh Man says:

    I have been using the site for a couple of years, just used it the other day to investigate replacing a front fork and headset. This is a great website, and Park makes great tools. Hadn’t thought of submitting this site to MAKE.

  2. keithmo says:

    http://bicycletutor.com/

    Alex produces short but instructional videos showing how to perform basic (and sometimes not-so-basic) bicycle maintenance. I’ve learned a lot from Alex’s videos and from the site’s forums.

  3. Jason says:

    When I was a bike mechanic, over 10 years ago now, Park were pretty much the tools to get for any of the esoteric repairs (wheels, bearings, you name it). Glad to see they’re still considered to be relevant. So many companies take their eye off the ball.

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