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Rohan Sharma and Jeff Buente, at Cornell University, posted detailed notes on their haptic vision project:

The ultrasonic haptic vision system enables a person to navigate hallways and around large objects without sight, through the use of an ultrasonic rangefinder that haptically interfaces with the user via tiny vibrating motors mounted on the user’s head. The idea behind this project was to construct a sixth sensory system that interacts with the body in an intuitive and user friendly fashion and enables the user to navigate without vision.


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Comments

  1. Ashu says:

    Found it interesting
    Ask to Ashu

  2. Alvaro Cassinelli says:

    Cute – although it’s bulky, it’s kind of cute this this little rotating “periscope” ;) I just wonder if the rotation of the sensor is fast enough so as to update the motors sufficiently fast.

    I’ve been working on something similar (you said that you were inspired by work at the university of Tokyo, I’m not sure you’are talking about my own work, but in any case check here:

    http://www.k2.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp/perception/HapticRadar/index-e.html

    keep up the good work!

    Alvaro Cassinelli
    Assistant Professor,
    Ishikawa-Komuro lab, The Univ. of Tokyo

    ps: by the way, my headband is unthethered (send data wirelessly to a PC fo making quantitative measures, see latest videos). We also tried ultrasound sensors (with I2C connection, but at the time we found them no much better than the long range IR rangefinders (up to 160cm).

  3. makeAl says:

    Cute contraption – although it’s bulky, this little rotating “periscope” is kind of cute ;) I just wonder if the rotation of the sensor is fast enough so as to update the motors sufficiently fast.

    I’ve been working on something similar (you said that you were inspired by work at the university of Tokyo, I’m not sure you’are talking about my own work, but in any case check here: http://www.k2.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp/perception/HapticRadar/index-e.html

    Keep up the good work,

    Alvaro Cassinelli
    Assistant Professor,
    Ishikawa-Komuro lab, The Univ. of Tokyo

    ps: by the way, my headband is unthethered (send data wirelessly to a PC fo making quantitative measures, see latest videos). We also tried ultrasound sensors (with I2C connection, but at the time we found them no much better than the long range IR rangefinders (up to 160cm).

  4. miscmusic.ru says:

    i think electics noodes screwed in the head is the better way.:D

  5. miscmusic.ru says:

    And my friends are still using a dog special :)

  6. Andrew says:

    Due to bone conduction, I don’t think having the tactors on the head would be a good idea. I have seen a number of studies (mostly within the Army) for tactile sensitivity on the torso. Obviously this would require a separate vest or belt, but possibly yield better performance.

    1. zviozdam says:

      Can embed directly into the brain? zviozdam.ru

  7. yogesh says:

    hi this is yogesh m from INDIA, sir m very much intrested in your project, pls help me to do project alone,, pls pls