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The ScrewShield for Arduino is a “wing-format” shield that extends the Arduino pins to sturdy, secure, and dependable screw terminal blocks. The wing design allows you to extend just one or both sides (“analog” & “digital”) of the Arduino, and still access the jumpers, LEDs, and buttons on the Arduino. Thanks to its extra-long header pins, the ScrewShield can be stacked above or below other shields. It’s a must have for anyone who is experimenting with the Arduino.

More about the ScrewShield for Arduino

Marc de Vinck

I’m currently working full time as the Dexter F. Baker Professor of Practice in Creativity in the Masters of Engineering in Technical Entrepreneurship Program at Lehigh University. I’m also an avid product designer, kit maker, author, father, tinkerer, and member of the MAKE Technical Advisory board.


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Comments

  1. AP says:

    While this looks like a very useful product, it is certainly not the case that it’s a *must have* for anyone experimenting with arduino.

    One of the great attributes of the arduino system is how little equipment one needs to buy to experiment with it. Please don’t sell the system short in order to hype a new accessory.

    1. Marc de Vinck says:

      OK, I agree. The Arduino is really capable on it’s own.

      I should have worded it as a “must have for anyone using heavy gauge, or multi-strand, wires” with the Arduino. Having screw terminals makes it a lot easier, and faster. (when working with heavy gauge wires)

  2. Anonymous says:

    For less money, and a much less floppy finished device, I put .100″ on-center (rather than the .200 OC pictured here) directly on the board.

    The Phoenix Contact connectors from Digikey that I use accept current up to 6 amps and 20 gauge wire.

    1. Registered User says:

      While I see how the ScrewShield could be very useful for some prototyping projects, I was also curious about your mention of another connector solution. Could explain a little more about the Phoenix Contact you mentioned?

      Thanks,
      .andy