Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!
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The Electronic Brick Starter kit allows you to easily connect various digital, analog, and I2C/Uart modules to any shield-compatible Arduino. The kit comes with 10 modules, and the sensor chassis. You can start building projects without the need to solder or breadboard. Just plug, program, and play!

Electronic Brick starter kit includes:

  • (1) Arduino sensor chassis
  • (1) LCD 16*2 Characters
  • (1) Rotary Angle Sensor (Analog)
  • (1) Button Switch
  • (1) Piezo buzzer
  • (1) Tilt Switch
  • (2) LEDs
  • (1) Light Sensor
  • (1) Temperature Sensor
  • (1) 2-pin Plugable terminal module
  • (5) Fully-buckled 3 Wire Cables
  • (1) 10-pin Colorful Ribbon Cable (for connecting the LCD)

Maker Shed

The Maker Shed is brought to you by Maker Media, the makers of MAKE Magazine, the Maker Faire, and much more.

Launched originally as a source for back issues of MAKE Magazine, the Maker Shed expanded rapidly to meet the demand for ‘projects in a box,’ otherwise known as kits. Now we have a little bit of everything for makers, crafters, and budding scientists, from Arduinos to sock monkeys to chemistry sets .


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Comments

  1. Anonymous says:

    Any reason one should pay your store $50+shipping instead of paying seeedstudio $45 with free shipping on orders over $50? And please, please, please, don’t say to support make. Just make a tip jar link if you want to make that arguement.

    1. Maker Shed says:

      Sometimes our prices are going to be higher, sometimes they’re going to be lower. Sometimes competitors are going to see what our prices are and then undercut them (not saying that’s happening here, but it happens).

      We’re proud of the work we do in the Maker Shed, the product we offer, and the business practices to which we adhere.

      Having said that, allow us to address why you might want to buy from the Maker Shed store, even when you can sometimes find a slightly lower price elsewhere.

      When you purchase a product in Maker Shed, attend Maker Faire or subscribe to MAKE magazine you’re doing more than quenching your own thirst for DIY inspiration, you’re helping to support an organization that is dedicated to unifying, inspiring, and educating a growing community of makers, students and educators. For example, we have a fire truck, called the Make: mobile, that we converted into a mobile DIY workshop that we take to schools throughout Northern California so that we can bring the joy of hands-on science and tech projects to schools and students who generally can’t afford that Arduino kit that many of us can. Another example: last month the Maker Shed store sent Marc de Vinck out to Chicago to work with an after school program to help train mentors and coaches to lead tech workshops with inner city youth. We picked up the tab. And in very real sense, if you’re a Maker Shed customer, YOU helped underwrite this.

      This past year MAKE provided financial and promotional support to literally hundreds of educational programs worldwide just for the asking. Sometimes we organized workshops; other times we sent kits and subscriptions to help the school raise much needed scholarship money. And we ask for nothing in return except the satisfaction that the DIY spirit and maker ethos are being shared with people who generally, due to economic or social circumstances, are left out.

      We should also point out that a good number of products in the Maker Shed are produced by indie makers who literally design, develop and package their kits in their living rooms. Maker Shed effectively invests in these tiny businesses and their ideas by buying small quantities of unique products that would otherwise never see the light of day. The mass producers will never take a chance on these makers or their kits. But we will. Not because it’s profitable to go that route, but because that’s our mission.

      The word “membership” is often overused by companies trying to confer a sense of privilege amongst their customers. In the case of MAKE, however, your support in the form of purchase or subscription is as much a pledge as a member of the maker community as it is a store purchase. You don’t wear your membership badge on your sleeve, per se, but you are tied together by your generosity as well as your curiosity. And for this, we salute you. Our pledge in return is to continue to seek out and support programs that will spread the passion, spirit and knowledge of makers through student mentorship and educational programs worldwide.

      So in the final analysis, the choice is yours as to where you shop and how you reach your purchase decision. On balance, we think we offer excellent value. More importantly, Maker Shed customers are proud to be part of something much larger, more inspiring and more enduring.

  2. John Boxall says:

    The Electronic Bricks may seem a little expensive, but when you need to do some rapid prototyping, they are life-savers. Plus they are very useful for children or those with poor eyesight. I wrote about my experiences with the bricks here: http://wp.me/pQmjR-9E

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