MAKE contributing editor Bill Gurstelle got a nice write-up in the Telegraph on the art of living (slightly) dangerously:

Citing various studies, Gurstelle argues that moderate risk taking has various benefits. Canadian researchers found that managers who took risks were more successful while a German study discovered that people who took more risks said they were happier.

Gurstelle believes his books tap into two rich seams in modern society – contempt for the health and safety bullies, and a more general fear of technology. While he describes himself as a liberal and doesn’t own a gun, he’s with the libertarians on the issue of being allowed to make your own mistakes.

“We live in the age of the lily-livered, where people make terrific efforts to remove all possible risks from their lives,” he says.

“It becomes a fairly pallid, sterile experience. You certainly won’t be hurt but you won’t be creative. And it’s especially true for children. Are they going to grow up to be so risk averse that they don’t contribute anything?”

America’s DIY ballistics king Bill Gurstelle shoots from the hip about health and safety

Gareth Branwyn

Gareth Branwyn

Gareth Branwyn is a freelance writer and the former Editorial Director of Maker Media. He is the author or editor of over a dozen books on technology, DIY, and geek culture. He is currently a contributor to Boing Boing, Wink Books, and Wink Fun. And he has a new best-of writing collection and “lazy person’s memoir,” called Borg Like Me.

  • Al

    Oh the irony…. (The Telegraph is a big proponent of the “wrap them in cotton wool to protect them” brigade and “there is a terrorist under every bed” school.)

    Some of the projects might be illegal in the UK (IANAL). I wouldn’t normally mention it, but the Telegraph is from the UK and they should know better….

    Holding an unlicensed firearm is a mandatory sentence and the judge has to convict regardless of intent (

    I dont know the exact details of the firearm laws here, but anything over a muzzle energy of 12ft.lbs for rifles and 6 ft.lbs for pistols is likely to be considered a firearm. Under that muzzle energy and its defined as an airgun, again they are heavily regulated. (Crossbows and the like are similarity regulated).

    Side question, What are the muzzle energy’s of the various spud type guns? And how do you work it out?

  • Anonymous

    Just noting the tower of FLAME UNDER THE POWER LINE…look up, it might save your life