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Noisebridge is proud to present Anti/Surveillance Fashion Show at the upcoming Maker Faire in San Mateo. Anti/Surveillance is a runway show exploring the uses of wearables for surveillance, and for hiding from surveillance. We are currently accepting submissions for participation in the show.



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Constantly under the lens of the camera, fashion is a natural form in which to explore the relationship between surveillance and culture. How are we watched? How do we watch? How do we present ourselves to the eyes of the world? At Maker Faire 2010, May 22-23, we will be presenting Anti/Surveillance, a runway show that explores the role of and our relationship with surveillance in our society.



We are looking for submissions covering the range from playful to practical. Do you make accessories that blind CCTV cameras with IR LEDs? Have you imagined makeup that will thwart face detection? Ever built an invisibility coat? Or maybe you just like to put QR codes on all your clothing to make it easier for people to track you.

The video, by Randy at fffff.at, relates to experiments where people tried hiding their faces with masses of IR LEDs, which emit light invisible to the human eye but visible to CCTV cameras. Got an idea for enhancing privacy in a time of seemingly burgeoning surveillance? Submit your project!

John Baichtal

My interests include writing, electronics, RPGs, scifi, hackers & hackerspaces, 3D printing, building sets & toys. @johnbaichtal nerdage.net


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Comments

  1. GeoffreyD says:

    Hello :-)

    I’m Geoffrey Dorne & I created (for my design degree in ENSAD), different objects to defeat the surveillance (CCTV, RFID badges, cameras, french laws like Hadopi, etc.)

    This is my work > http://h4cker.net/blog/

    (enjoy the prezi doc !)

    Thank you ;-)

    Geoffrey Dorne

  2. voodoo says:

    As a photographer I find the failed results in the video totally unsurprising. What these guys are trying to exploit is overexposure – but they’re going about it the wrong way.

    I strikes me that what they want to do is point the LEDs towards *the face* rather than at the camera. If they flood the face with enough LED light then this will cause overexposure in that area and a total loss of detail – thereby achieving the aim of obscuring the identity of the individual.

    This could take the form of a baseball cap with the underside of the peak studded with IR LEDs.

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