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Looking to improve your documentation photography on the cheap? Rather than buying a glitzy new camera, you might want to focus your effort on improving your lighting. And you don’t have to spent much money, either. Over at CRAFT, Brookelynn Morris has a nice write-up of the photography tools that she uses for her tutorial photos, which consists mostly of inexpensive lights and light modifiers.

Lighting doesn’t have to be complicated or fancy (just turn a couple of them on!), however if you are interested in learning about it, I would suggest checking out a copy of Light, Science and Magic.


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Comments

  1. Tom says:

    How is this useful or interesting to anyone? Feels more like an advertisement to me…

    1. Matt Mets says:

      I’m sorry you feel this way- Brookelynn certainly isn’t selling anything on her post (she didn’t even mention any product names), and I only mentioned the book because I read it and think it is useful. You can probably find it at your library :-)

  2. simplehoomin.myopenid.com says:

    We take lots of pictures of small things that we sell online and one of the problems we have is that many pictures come out too “yellow”. We’ve tried adjusting or turning off the white balance feature on the camera, tried various other settings and different cameras and it just boils down to the type of light produced by modern light bulbs. We’ve tried “daylight” bulbs from the local hardware store, even fluorescent bulbs, CFL bulbs or incandescent bulbs of varying wattage and had no luck. Unless you’re planning on tweaking your color balance constantly in a photo-editing program to make up for this, I’d recommend bulbs by ALZO ( http://alzodigital.com/online_store/replacement_lamps.htm ), any of the top 3 bulbs in the list work great! All we have is 2 of those cheap aluminum hardware store light dishes, a white “tent” made from fabric store nylon, and a small piece of plexiglass held up by wooden blocks. Macro photo studio on the cheap with good lighting!