Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!

_dsc1078_multivu_2_playing_soccer.jpg

I remember awhile back when video of the original XOS prototype made the rounds. Well, now, defense behemoth Raytheon is back with another somewhat cheesy testosterone-fueled video showing the new lighter, stronger XOS 2 prototype performing various feats of strength in preparation for the upcoming holiday season. There’s heavy metal music and one of the actors from Iron Man who is not, ah, actually Iron Man.

water_ammo_upload.jpg

All kidding aside, this is pretty neat. It supposedly uses 50% less power than the first prototype and is stronger to boot. And in spite of the “superweapon” marketing the concept sketches betray the rather more unglamorous function such devices are intended to play in a military context, i.e. allowing fewer people to load and unload more stuff, faster. [via Gizmodo]

More:

Sean Michael Ragan

I am descended from 5,000 generations of tool-using primates. Also, I went to college and stuff. I write for MAKE, serve as Technical Editor for MAKE magazine, and develop original DIY content for Make: Projects.


Related

Comments

  1. RocketGuy says:

    The Aliens Loader and this thing almost look related.

    I happened to have personally been in the room with one of the early research units in the lab (not at raytheon, but I think it may have been a partnership with them), it’s definitely come a long way.

    Look forward to V3, and a non-militarized version…

  2. ROB K636 says:

    Not full exoskeleton like the other but a backpack with legs.

    “Berkeley Bionicsâ„¢, designs and manufactures lower extremity exoskeletons to augment human strength and endurance during locomotion. Berkeley Bionics exoskeletons increase wearer’s strength while decreasing their metabolic cost of walking. The company is also attacking the technological barriers to a practical, affordable exoskeleton for civilian and medical applications, particularly to assist patients with neurological or muscular mobility disorders. These powered human exoskeletons would allow their wearers to walk upright without the strain and muscular effort required by today’s unpowered orthotic devices.”