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This video is absolutely stunning, not only because of the excellence of the Lego construct, but because of beauty of the presentation. Wanna learn more about the Antikythera Mechanism? You’ve come to the right place. MAKE Volume 17 discusses the ancient device in “The Kosmos in a Box” on page 30 while Volume 24 covers a previous Lego Antikythera on page 27.

From MAKE magazine:

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Check out MAKE, Volume 17: The Lost Knowledge issue!

Buy your copy in the Maker Shed, Subscribe to MAKE, or Access the Digital Edition (if you’re already a subscriber).

In Volume 17, MAKE goes really old school with the Lost Knowledge issue, featuring projects and articles covering the steampunk scene — makers creating their own alternative Victorian world through modified computers, phones, cars, costumes, and other fantastic creations. Projects include an elegant Wimshurst Influence Machine (an electrostatic generator built entirely from Home Depot parts), a Florence Siphon coffee brewer, and a teacup-powered Stirling engine. This special section also covers watchmaking, letterpress printing, the early multimedia art of William Blake, and other wondrous and lost (or fading) pre-20th-century technologies.

John Baichtal

My interests include writing, electronics, RPGs, scifi, hackers & hackerspaces, 3D printing, building sets & toys. @johnbaichtal nerdage.net


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Comments

  1. vrandy.myopenid.com says:

    I wonder how long Lego bricks would last at the bottom of the ocean.

  2. MadRat says:

    I’m not sure if Make 17 and 24 have plans (sorry I’m kind of poor) but the guy in the video says he’s working on plans for his creation. Might be interesting to get some Legos and put one together.

  3. mnwcsult says:

    I have downloaded all available pictures videos and have began my reverse engineering of the remarkable model. Although my children had hundreds of Lego only a few are actually suitable. My sons have long since graduated from college and left the Lego’s behind. Most what the engineer was using come from Technics and NXT Mind storm components. A lot of what is needed are the Connector Pegs with Cross Axles (W970606), Connector Pegs with Friction 3M – Black (W970605), Connector Pegs with Friction (W970604) they probably account for at least a third of the parts list. You’ll also need Studless Technic Beams (W991402) particularly the size thirteen and Technic Cross Blocks (W991405). Some of it will come from Ebay but the pricing from the Ebay Lego stores is almost twice what it is from Lego education http://www.legoeducation.us/store/. I have spent around 100.00 USD so far and have only the 5/19th’s rear module and the center drive train. I have not yet figured out the support layout. If you considered it as being 9 modules at 50-75 USD per module. You get the idea. I am looking at this being a several months project. I would love the see the plans but reverse engineering also has it rewards.

    1. Michael Macklin says:

      Manage to work up the instructions for this? Love to build one for my grandson’s school.

  4. How does one go about building your own? I would like to make one for my astronomy class

    1. Anonymous says:

      same here im trying to find some kind of help for building this maybe we could email the creator and see if he would give us the directions??

    2. Tim says:

      Hey Meredith, did you ever find any references for building your own?

      Thanks!