Bubble Photography Tips and Tricks

Goli Mohammadi

I'm a word nerd who loves to geek out on how emerging technology affects the lexicon. I was an editor on the first 40 volumes of MAKE, and I love shining light on the incredible makers in our community. In particular, covering art is my passion — after all, art is the first thing most of us ever made. When not fawning over perfect word choices, I can be found on the nearest mountain, looking for untouched powder fields and ideal alpine lakes.

Contact me at [email protected] or via @snowgoli.

999 Articles

By Goli Mohammadi

I'm a word nerd who loves to geek out on how emerging technology affects the lexicon. I was an editor on the first 40 volumes of MAKE, and I love shining light on the incredible makers in our community. In particular, covering art is my passion — after all, art is the first thing most of us ever made. When not fawning over perfect word choices, I can be found on the nearest mountain, looking for untouched powder fields and ideal alpine lakes.

Contact me at [email protected] or via @snowgoli.

999 Articles

suckaface_bubble_photog_opener.jpg
I’m completely enamored by Tom Falconer’s gorgeous bubble photography, and he was nice enough to share his tips and tricks with us. Tom is a Tahoe resident, so he’s blessed by beautiful surroundings and cold temps that make shots like the one above possible. When I asked about shooting frozen bubbles, he said: “Frozen bubbles are easier to shoot than regular ones. Once it freezes, it just sits there. But floating bubbles in the wild are unpredictable and almost always tricky to photograph sharply.” Check out this shot of a frozen bubble popping slowly:
suckaface-bubble-photog-frozen-popping.jpg
The caption for this shot reads: “Bubbles get a bit rubbery when they freeze, so when they pop it happens really slow. It was around 15-20 °F and this bubble took about two minutes to freeze. When it’s colder they freeze really fast and will shatter more like glass. This bubble took about fifteen minutes to disintegrate.”
The way Tom captures reflections in the bubbles is truly notable as well:
suckaface-bubble-photog-reflections.jpg
Head over to the Makezine post to read his bubble formula and tips on bubble photography, and be sure to check out the rest of his Flickr stream for more eye candy.

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