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Riding at night can be a daunting and dangerous task; many biking commuters are faced with the issue of being obscured when riding on the streets. Visibility at night is a vital component of biker safety, hence the need for reflectors and attachable lights. However, some of these devices are not always effective especially from the side.

We created a system that requires very little rider input and maintenance, while increasing the visual footprint of bikers from all directions especially from the side. We accomplished this by expanding the surface area of light emitted through the use of RGB LEDs inside the rims of the wheels that change from red when slowing down to white when at cruising speed.

John Baichtal

My interests include writing, electronics, RPGs, scifi, hackers & hackerspaces, 3D printing, building sets & toys. @johnbaichtal nerdage.net


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Comments

  1.  Very cool, and their documentation is pretty thorough. I do wonder if exposed copper will corrode though….

    (By the way, the “we created a system” link is broken. Correct url is http://surg2011.tumblr.com )

  2. Simon Gibson says:

    Great idea but how about putting on a high visibility (Hi-Viz) reflective vest, low tech, low cost, all round visibility not just the side.

  3. Walter says:

    Seems like a “cool” idea without any practicality.   In most places (at least in the US) bicycles are required to have a front light and a rear light, a requirement which this gadget doesn’t meet.  Hub powered generators are already commercially available for the conventional and required lighting, though battery powered units are also available.

    Further this gadget doesn’t provide a light to actually see obstructions while riding…

    In short this is a typical example of a designer letting form outweigh the basic need for functionality…

    1.  I’d think that this project isn’t a replacement or alternative to front and back lights, but rather, an additional lighting system to improve side visibility.

      1. Walter says:

         And yet the video shows a bicycle with only this gadget and all other safety features either not present (front and rear lights) or have been removed (the traditional spoke reflectors included on bikes).

        In short a poor solution to a problem which doesn’t exist.

        1. Instead of presuming to speak for the designers, I’ll let their own words about the project respond to you.

          “Attachable front and rear lights are great at making riders seen, but they are not always the most effective way of increasing visibility to all motorists, especially from the side. Additionally, front and rear lights do little to identify a biker as a biker as opposed to an ambiguous blinking point of light. Many bikes have reflectors on the wheels and the frame. But reflectors are only effective when they are in the direct headlight of an automobile, an inadequate solution.” ( http://www.jonathanota.com/#1036766/Project-Aura-Bike-Safety )

          “It should be noted that Project Aura is a lighting system which allows a rider to be seen, but does not replace a forward facing headlight to illuminate the roadway. By law (in Pennsylvania, the laws vary state by state) a front headlamp and rear reflector are required, use of a rear blinky is up to the rider‘s discretion.” ( http://www.ethanfrier.com/surgbike.html )

      2. Walter says:

         And yet the video shows a bicycle with only this gadget and all other safety features either not present (front and rear lights) or have been removed (the traditional spoke reflectors included on bikes).

        In short a poor solution to a problem which doesn’t exist.

    2. Lexica says:

      “In short this is a typical example of a designer letting form outweigh the basic need for functionality… ”

      Not at all. Nearly 70% of all nighttime bicycle-car collisions are due to side visibility, which, as the beginning of the video shows, front and rear lights do nothing to address. Rock The Bike have a post on their website about the importance of side visibility: http://rockthebike.com/lights/downlowglow/sidevisibilityThe Project Aura system is a “to be seen” lighting system, not a “to see by” lighting system. If you want something to see by, get a good headlight or preferably two (one handlebar-mounted, one head-mounted). If, however, you want something to help the other people on the road see you, this looks like a pretty good system. (I wish Rock The Bike could get the bugs worked out of their Down Low Glow system — similar idea as far as side visibility, but because it’s not dynamo-powered it stays illuminated even when stopped.)And as far as the suggestion farther up to simply wear a reflective vest, reflective material is significantly less effective at increasing visibility than actual powered lighting.

      1. Walter says:

         Side visibility is easily addressed with the built in spoke reflectors on bike or even with reflective side wall tires. 

        Again the video shows this lighting system as the only lights on the bike.  In the US that would be illegal; headlight and tailight are required for riding at night on the road.  Lack of a headlight places the rider at risk in not being able to see obstacles.  Your 70% statistic is an excellent example of using misleading statistics.  Notice the domain, it only covers bicycle-car collisions.  What about bicycle-bicycle, bicycle-pedestrian, and bicycle-inanimate object?

        This gadget is essentially useless in those scenarios.

        Oh, dynamo powered lights (the useful kind) can also stay lit for up to several minutes after the bicycle has stopped.

    3. john says:

      Agreed.  They didn’t even bother to research other implementations before charging forth either.  Kind of silly.  

  4. Anonymous says:

    Neat idea, but the execution seems excessively complex.  Why not just clip a few battery driven LEDs to the spokes? 

  5. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  6. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  7. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  8. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  9. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  10. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  11. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  12. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  13. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  14. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  15. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  16. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  17. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  18. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  19. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  20. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  21. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  22. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  23. Timothy Gray says:

    Far more effective a very bright flashing light that nearly blinds the car drivers.  I have a 3Watt red led on a focused assembly on the rear of my bike that blinks at a 5 hz and dual 5W white on the front that does the same. 

  24. [...] Este deporte no se recomienda que sea practicado de noche a menos que uses un sistema como el proyecto Aura. [...]

  25. Random Rust says:

     You want a bike to be visible at decsion points.  Where the viewer has to decide what to do.  Pull out of the side street or stay where they are?  Continue straight ahead at this speed or slow down?  Turn into a street or wait?

    If I am pullng out of a side street, I need to make that decision while the bike is at a distance from me. If it is close enough that pulling out means I hit it, I have to stay still.

    If the bike is already side on to me, then the decision point is well past!  Even if I pull out unless the bike is going very slowly by the time the car starts moving the bike is past.

    Same if I want to turn into a side street.  I need to see the front of the bike, not the side.

    So being majorly visible only from the side is false safety, and that’s rather obvious from one of the shots in the linked page where the bike coming towards us is visible from the streetlights, but not from the rim lights. (And I note in the bits of the movie I saw that the shots are all side on and as soon as you get exactly in front or behind it cuts out.  Now why might that be….)

    Reflective pedals to give a recognisable eye catching motion, a bright steady rear light (to make it eaiser to judge distance) and a flashing rear light (to signal bicycle) plus a strong steady front light are what a bicycle needs.

    Sure it looks pretty but that’s about it.  Market it as a cool idea to make your bike look good, don’t say it is about safety because it isn’t.

      

  26. Random Rust says:

     You want a bike to be visible at decsion points.  Where the viewer has to decide what to do.  Pull out of the side street or stay where they are?  Continue straight ahead at this speed or slow down?  Turn into a street or wait?

    If I am pullng out of a side street, I need to make that decision while the bike is at a distance from me. If it is close enough that pulling out means I hit it, I have to stay still.

    If the bike is already side on to me, then the decision point is well past!  Even if I pull out unless the bike is going very slowly by the time the car starts moving the bike is past.

    Same if I want to turn into a side street.  I need to see the front of the bike, not the side.

    So being majorly visible only from the side is false safety, and that’s rather obvious from one of the shots in the linked page where the bike coming towards us is visible from the streetlights, but not from the rim lights. (And I note in the bits of the movie I saw that the shots are all side on and as soon as you get exactly in front or behind it cuts out.  Now why might that be….)

    Reflective pedals to give a recognisable eye catching motion, a bright steady rear light (to make it eaiser to judge distance) and a flashing rear light (to signal bicycle) plus a strong steady front light are what a bicycle needs.

    Sure it looks pretty but that’s about it.  Market it as a cool idea to make your bike look good, don’t say it is about safety because it isn’t.

      

  27. Random Rust says:

     You want a bike to be visible at decsion points.  Where the viewer has to decide what to do.  Pull out of the side street or stay where they are?  Continue straight ahead at this speed or slow down?  Turn into a street or wait?

    If I am pullng out of a side street, I need to make that decision while the bike is at a distance from me. If it is close enough that pulling out means I hit it, I have to stay still.

    If the bike is already side on to me, then the decision point is well past!  Even if I pull out unless the bike is going very slowly by the time the car starts moving the bike is past.

    Same if I want to turn into a side street.  I need to see the front of the bike, not the side.

    So being majorly visible only from the side is false safety, and that’s rather obvious from one of the shots in the linked page where the bike coming towards us is visible from the streetlights, but not from the rim lights. (And I note in the bits of the movie I saw that the shots are all side on and as soon as you get exactly in front or behind it cuts out.  Now why might that be….)

    Reflective pedals to give a recognisable eye catching motion, a bright steady rear light (to make it eaiser to judge distance) and a flashing rear light (to signal bicycle) plus a strong steady front light are what a bicycle needs.

    Sure it looks pretty but that’s about it.  Market it as a cool idea to make your bike look good, don’t say it is about safety because it isn’t.

      

  28. Random Rust says:

     You want a bike to be visible at decsion points.  Where the viewer has to decide what to do.  Pull out of the side street or stay where they are?  Continue straight ahead at this speed or slow down?  Turn into a street or wait?

    If I am pullng out of a side street, I need to make that decision while the bike is at a distance from me. If it is close enough that pulling out means I hit it, I have to stay still.

    If the bike is already side on to me, then the decision point is well past!  Even if I pull out unless the bike is going very slowly by the time the car starts moving the bike is past.

    Same if I want to turn into a side street.  I need to see the front of the bike, not the side.

    So being majorly visible only from the side is false safety, and that’s rather obvious from one of the shots in the linked page where the bike coming towards us is visible from the streetlights, but not from the rim lights. (And I note in the bits of the movie I saw that the shots are all side on and as soon as you get exactly in front or behind it cuts out.  Now why might that be….)

    Reflective pedals to give a recognisable eye catching motion, a bright steady rear light (to make it eaiser to judge distance) and a flashing rear light (to signal bicycle) plus a strong steady front light are what a bicycle needs.

    Sure it looks pretty but that’s about it.  Market it as a cool idea to make your bike look good, don’t say it is about safety because it isn’t.

      

  29. Random Rust says:

     You want a bike to be visible at decsion points.  Where the viewer has to decide what to do.  Pull out of the side street or stay where they are?  Continue straight ahead at this speed or slow down?  Turn into a street or wait?

    If I am pullng out of a side street, I need to make that decision while the bike is at a distance from me. If it is close enough that pulling out means I hit it, I have to stay still.

    If the bike is already side on to me, then the decision point is well past!  Even if I pull out unless the bike is going very slowly by the time the car starts moving the bike is past.

    Same if I want to turn into a side street.  I need to see the front of the bike, not the side.

    So being majorly visible only from the side is false safety, and that’s rather obvious from one of the shots in the linked page where the bike coming towards us is visible from the streetlights, but not from the rim lights. (And I note in the bits of the movie I saw that the shots are all side on and as soon as you get exactly in front or behind it cuts out.  Now why might that be….)

    Reflective pedals to give a recognisable eye catching motion, a bright steady rear light (to make it eaiser to judge distance) and a flashing rear light (to signal bicycle) plus a strong steady front light are what a bicycle needs.

    Sure it looks pretty but that’s about it.  Market it as a cool idea to make your bike look good, don’t say it is about safety because it isn’t.

      

  30. Very nice. Couple of these http://www.taiwan-bicycle.com.tw/Pd_Show.asp?PidNo=200611300022 on each side would do the same thing. But not as stylishly. :)

  31. Max Max says:

     anybody know what the track and artist name is in the video? real cool tune :)

  32. Max Max says:

     ah!
    Music by Gold Panda – “You”

  33. Max Max says:

     ah!
    Music by Gold Panda – “You”

  34. Max Max says:

     ah!
    Music by Gold Panda – “You”

  35. Anonymous says:

     what is it with all the negativity? i don’t perceive that the inventors intend to replace front and rear lighting with these LEDs–they clearly posit these as an addiitonal means of illuminating the rider from the side, and significantly so–a vest won’t communicate the size or shape of the bicycle from the side, nor would wheel-mounted reflectors; both require a headlight or other light source to illuminate them.

    i have a dutch bike with a hub dynamo system to power both my front and back lights. i also have reflective schwalbe tires. but i would add these in a heartbeat, as more is more, when it comes to visibility. that this is not subject to batteries burning out, and uses power i already generate, i’m all for it as a viable and sustainable option.

    the naysayers love to pull new ideas down, and rarely, if ever, produce any of their own. screw them. bravo!

    1. john says:

      I think part of the negativity is in the fact that they charged forward with a school design project without fully researching what else had been done and wound up with something that looks really cool but has a predictable set of flaws.  Which, you’re right, is bred out of total nay-saying.  They still DID SOMETHING, and on it’s own merits they’re successful in what they set out to do.  But I’d be frustrated … hell, AM frustrated that a nifty website and video gets you all this traffic whereas imminently practical and D.I.Y. solutions that have been shared on websites like Make and Instructables are getting ignored. 

      1. Anonymous says:

        they DID do something, and apparently, it was part of a larger design competition or collective at CM. i don’t see it as highly or obviously flawed, but that owes to the fact that i have a hub dynamo for my front/back lighting system, and i see the possibility of adapting this additional use.

        moreover, i didn’t know that the make philosophy allows for people to pile on and make someone wrong for trying their hand at a solution. as others have said, at least they put it out there, and they didn’t do so to steal anyone else’s traffic or compel people to ignore other “solutions”. the make/instructables community always appeared to be inclusive, and would be that much better by encouraging improvement or modification to make something viable, rather than bathing an effort in a lot of sour grapes. one could find flaws in just about every “solution” out there–why make these guys wrong for proposing something? it seems antithetical.

    2. john says:

      I think part of the negativity is in the fact that they charged forward with a school design project without fully researching what else had been done and wound up with something that looks really cool but has a predictable set of flaws.  Which, you’re right, is bred out of total nay-saying.  They still DID SOMETHING, and on it’s own merits they’re successful in what they set out to do.  But I’d be frustrated … hell, AM frustrated that a nifty website and video gets you all this traffic whereas imminently practical and D.I.Y. solutions that have been shared on websites like Make and Instructables are getting ignored. 

  36. Anonymous says:

     what is it with all the negativity? i don’t perceive that the inventors intend to replace front and rear lighting with these LEDs–they clearly posit these as an addiitonal means of illuminating the rider from the side, and significantly so–a vest won’t communicate the size or shape of the bicycle from the side, nor would wheel-mounted reflectors; both require a headlight or other light source to illuminate them.

    i have a dutch bike with a hub dynamo system to power both my front and back lights. i also have reflective schwalbe tires. but i would add these in a heartbeat, as more is more, when it comes to visibility. that this is not subject to batteries burning out, and uses power i already generate, i’m all for it as a viable and sustainable option.

    the naysayers love to pull new ideas down, and rarely, if ever, produce any of their own. screw them. bravo!

  37. Anonymous says:

    pay attention people… he has front and rear lights that are obviously displayed at the beginning of the vid. bunch a negative nancys and donny downers on here. yes, it seems like a bit of pain to install – but it looks freakin awesome! did you see how well you could see him from that distance shot? yes, reflector vests are cool, until the drunk driver who forgot to turn on his lights come up on ya…

  38. Anonymous says:

    pay attention people… he has front and rear lights that are obviously displayed at the beginning of the vid. bunch a negative nancys and donny downers on here. yes, it seems like a bit of pain to install – but it looks freakin awesome! did you see how well you could see him from that distance shot? yes, reflector vests are cool, until the drunk driver who forgot to turn on his lights come up on ya…

  39. Anonymous says:

    pay attention people… he has front and rear lights that are obviously displayed at the beginning of the vid. bunch a negative nancys and donny downers on here. yes, it seems like a bit of pain to install – but it looks freakin awesome! did you see how well you could see him from that distance shot? yes, reflector vests are cool, until the drunk driver who forgot to turn on his lights come up on ya…

  40. I am a friend of your dads.  Terrific idea. Saw him Fri and he told me about it.  Make sure you get this to a patent attorney

  41. I am a friend of your dads.  Terrific idea. Saw him Fri and he told me about it.  Make sure you get this to a patent attorney

  42. I think this is a great idea. The added sense of security and visibility is a must for all night-time riders…

    That being said, I feel a strong need to address that negative comments I have been reading concerning this product. It seems that most people are arguing that this does not provide the same security and visibility as front and rear lights.

    And they would be right.

    However, if they bothered to pay attention they would realize that this product is not advertised as a replacement for any of the already popular safety features that most bikes use. This includes front and rear lights, reflectors, etc.This product is meant as an ADDITION to these products to address a VERY SPECIFIC area of concern: side visibility when there is no light to be reflected (using reflectors). For anyone who rides a bike at night, they know how dangerous it can be; any additional, practical function to a bike that addresses the need for safety is a must. This product addresses that.

    “And yet the video shows a bicycle with only this gadget and all other safety features either not present (front and rear lights) or have been removed (the traditional spoke reflectors included on bikes).” 
    ~Walter 2 weeks ago in reply to Andrew S. Parnell

    For all those who don’t seem to understand the idea of marketing and demonstration, I will say this: If you are trying to demonstrate the functionality of a specific safety feature that addresses a specific area of concern and you want the functionality to be presented in a way that it will be fully appreciated, then including any other safety features that would normally be found on a bike (features that the creators of this product state you should still use) would take away from what the video is trying to demonstrate: the effectiveness of their product. While both this lighting system and other common safety features are important and both would be implemented at the same time in a real-world situation, people would not be able to fully appreciate and understand the effectiveness of these lights if they are being overwhelmed by other safety features.

    In short, the video was a demonstration. In a real world situation, all safety features (including this one) would be used at the same time. It addresses a very specific but equally important issue in safety. Overall great idea.

  43. I think this is a great idea. The added sense of security and visibility is a must for all night-time riders…

    That being said, I feel a strong need to address that negative comments I have been reading concerning this product. It seems that most people are arguing that this does not provide the same security and visibility as front and rear lights.

    And they would be right.

    However, if they bothered to pay attention they would realize that this product is not advertised as a replacement for any of the already popular safety features that most bikes use. This includes front and rear lights, reflectors, etc.This product is meant as an ADDITION to these products to address a VERY SPECIFIC area of concern: side visibility when there is no light to be reflected (using reflectors). For anyone who rides a bike at night, they know how dangerous it can be; any additional, practical function to a bike that addresses the need for safety is a must. This product addresses that.

    “And yet the video shows a bicycle with only this gadget and all other safety features either not present (front and rear lights) or have been removed (the traditional spoke reflectors included on bikes).” 
    ~Walter 2 weeks ago in reply to Andrew S. Parnell

    For all those who don’t seem to understand the idea of marketing and demonstration, I will say this: If you are trying to demonstrate the functionality of a specific safety feature that addresses a specific area of concern and you want the functionality to be presented in a way that it will be fully appreciated, then including any other safety features that would normally be found on a bike (features that the creators of this product state you should still use) would take away from what the video is trying to demonstrate: the effectiveness of their product. While both this lighting system and other common safety features are important and both would be implemented at the same time in a real-world situation, people would not be able to fully appreciate and understand the effectiveness of these lights if they are being overwhelmed by other safety features.

    In short, the video was a demonstration. In a real world situation, all safety features (including this one) would be used at the same time. It addresses a very specific but equally important issue in safety. Overall great idea.

  44. I think this is a great idea. The added sense of security and visibility is a must for all night-time riders…

    That being said, I feel a strong need to address that negative comments I have been reading concerning this product. It seems that most people are arguing that this does not provide the same security and visibility as front and rear lights.

    And they would be right.

    However, if they bothered to pay attention they would realize that this product is not advertised as a replacement for any of the already popular safety features that most bikes use. This includes front and rear lights, reflectors, etc.This product is meant as an ADDITION to these products to address a VERY SPECIFIC area of concern: side visibility when there is no light to be reflected (using reflectors). For anyone who rides a bike at night, they know how dangerous it can be; any additional, practical function to a bike that addresses the need for safety is a must. This product addresses that.

    “And yet the video shows a bicycle with only this gadget and all other safety features either not present (front and rear lights) or have been removed (the traditional spoke reflectors included on bikes).” 
    ~Walter 2 weeks ago in reply to Andrew S. Parnell

    For all those who don’t seem to understand the idea of marketing and demonstration, I will say this: If you are trying to demonstrate the functionality of a specific safety feature that addresses a specific area of concern and you want the functionality to be presented in a way that it will be fully appreciated, then including any other safety features that would normally be found on a bike (features that the creators of this product state you should still use) would take away from what the video is trying to demonstrate: the effectiveness of their product. While both this lighting system and other common safety features are important and both would be implemented at the same time in a real-world situation, people would not be able to fully appreciate and understand the effectiveness of these lights if they are being overwhelmed by other safety features.

    In short, the video was a demonstration. In a real world situation, all safety features (including this one) would be used at the same time. It addresses a very specific but equally important issue in safety. Overall great idea.

  45. Anonymous says:

    All night bicycle collision nearly 70% due to side visibility,Project Aura is a “be seen” lighting system, video display, front and rear lights, and do nothing address. If you want to see things need to fit headlights in bike. However, if you want something to help other people on the road to see you, this looks like a good system.

  46. Safety Lights says:

    I’d say
    that this is a significant advancement in cycle safety. I wouldn’t recommend
    replacing the front and rear lights with them as it appears in the video
    (probably just for the video) but to have something this visual for cyclists
    at night will undeniably save lives
     

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