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Michael Zheng of PetaPixel credits these beautiful photographs to one Duncan Meeder, whose personal web presence, if it exists, escapes my Googling. This example is identified as a Leica Tri-Elmar-M 28-35-50mm. [via Boing Boing]

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Sean Michael Ragan

I am descended from 5,000 generations of tool-using primates. Also, I went to college and stuff. I write for MAKE, serve as Technical Editor for MAKE magazine, and develop original DIY content for Make: Projects.


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Comments

  1. Anonymous says:

    Pictures like this help me to feel better about spending hundreds on lenses for my DSLR.  From the outside, it doesn’t look that complex, but looking at the intricacy of this cross-section puts it in perspective.

  2. not only is this really complex on the inside, but I’ve watched videos on how they’re made. they have to be hand-made in extreme cleanliness, otherwise one speck of dust could get caught inside and ruin the whole shebang.

  3. not only is this really complex on the inside, but I’ve watched videos on how they’re made. they have to be hand-made in extreme cleanliness, otherwise one speck of dust could get caught inside and ruin the whole shebang.

  4.  Any idea what cutting tech is used to make something like this?  Water jet, perhaps?  There was a whole car bisected like this at the Detroit Auto Show a few years back, and it blew me away too.

  5.  Any idea what cutting tech is used to make something like this?  Water jet, perhaps?  There was a whole car bisected like this at the Detroit Auto Show a few years back, and it blew me away too.

    1. Chris Hamlin says:

      no, wouldn’t be waterjet.  some portion of the jet spreads out across any perpendicular surface, so all the lenses would have a etched appearance, rather than the high polish they have maintained.  

      personally, my guess would be a diamond abrasive saw, with a very fine blade. with steady clamping and a low feed rate, it would go through glass and all the different metals used here.  difficult to say for certain though as all the cutting marks have been polished away. 

    2. Anonymous says:

      My exact first thought! How the F#$% did they do that?

      I’d like to think it was LASERS!

    3. Anonymous says:

      My exact first thought! How the F#$% did they do that?

      I’d like to think it was LASERS!

    4. Anonymous says:

      My exact first thought! How the F#$% did they do that?

      I’d like to think it was LASERS!

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