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Whenever I bring my TV-B-Gone out to restaurants, I look suspicious pointing it around. So I embedded the device into a jacket and turned it into a wearable TV silencer. For the switch, I sewed paths of conductive thread that become bridged by the metal zipper pull when it passes by. At the restaurant or bar, all I have to do is unzip my jacket to turn off the TV(s).

Subscribe to the CRAFT Podcast in iTunes, download the m4v video directly, or watch it on YouTube. Music by i am jen.

tvbgonejacketinsideboard.jpg

For this project you need:

  • Super TV-B-Gone Kit (available from Maker Shed)
  • conductive thread
  • jacket with metal zipper pull
  • sewing needle and regular thread
  • seam ripper (or very small scissors)
  • tailor’s chalk
  • soldering iron/solder
  • pliers
  • wire strippers
  • wire snips
  • insulated wire (stranded)
  • heat shrink tubing

Check out the complete a complete step-by-step tutorial for the previous version of this project, the TV-B-Gone Hoodie, over on Make: Projects.

More:

Becky Stern

Becky Stern is head of wearable electronics at Adafruit Industries. Her personal site: sternlab.org


Related

Comments

  1. Hey neat! But wouldn’t it be easier to ask if the TV could be turned off?

  2. Hey neat! But wouldn’t it be easier to ask if the TV could be turned off?

    1. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

    2. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

    3. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

    4. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

    5. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

    6. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

    7. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

    8. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

    9. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

      1. geekd says:

        In their own place, it is their right.  Don’t like it, go to someone else’s place.

        Why is this so hard to understand?  If you go to a bar/restaurant that has TVs on, and you don’t like it, GO SOMEWHERE ELSE.  It is totally their right to play their TV as loud as they want in their establishment.  It IS NOT your right to turn it off with this gizmo.

      2. geekd says:

        In their own place, it is their right.  Don’t like it, go to someone else’s place.

        Why is this so hard to understand?  If you go to a bar/restaurant that has TVs on, and you don’t like it, GO SOMEWHERE ELSE.  It is totally their right to play their TV as loud as they want in their establishment.  It IS NOT your right to turn it off with this gizmo.

      3. Alli Crilly says:

        I’m a restaurant manager.  If I’m asked by a guest to turn the tv, music, or even ask the band to quiet down, I do it.  Have you ever tried asking?  Restaurant staff are actually human, you know. 

    10. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

    11. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

    12. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

    13. Good luck with that strategy. People feel like it’s their God-given right to blare whatever they want.

  3. Kerrigan Marois says:

    yeah great, now some jerk-off can turn off the tv that someone might be watching and enjoying. It would be nice if you had one that I could take to annoying maker sheds with an tool that could turn off dremels and hot glue guns….

  4. Kerrigan Marois says:

    yeah great, now some jerk-off can turn off the tv that someone might be watching and enjoying. It would be nice if you had one that I could take to annoying maker sheds with an tool that could turn off dremels and hot glue guns….

    1. Jaron Chan says:

      have to agree with you there.. try this in a pub when a game is on and you better be ready to deal with a rioting crowd..
      cool idea though..

      1. Anonymous says:

        Maybe a better idea for parents?

        Mom ” Turn that TV off!”

        “Mom! I have to find a save point!” (mom lifts lid off of jar and tv turns off).

        “….”

    2. Anonymous says:

      @kerriganmarois:disqus it goes both ways, what if you’re trying to avoid a distracting television? the tv-b-gone is more than an object, it’s meant for all of us to think about public spaces, the role of tv and social norms. it also turns tvs on as well as off, and it’s a harmless prank for some too.

      1. Anonymous says:

        Like a sports-bar or pub shouldn’t have tvs on the wall? I think a majority of patrons go there for that reason as a main draw. Not that I don’t think its a neat device, but when you are a patron, you accept what the restaurant/bar has to offer, that goes for food, drinks, seats and televisions. You don’t go in, decide you don’t like the food, and pull your own food out of your bag.

      2. geekd says:

        If you are in someone else’s place, and you don’t like the fact that they have their TV on (not your TV, their TV), then you ASK them to turn it off.  If you force it off, you are being a jerk.

        “Social norms”  that makes me laugh.  Society works because we all agree to not be jerks.  Messing with other people’s stuff with out their permission is being a jerk.

        The sense of entitlement the creation of this device reveals just galls me.

        1. Anonymous says:

          i use a tv-b-gone to turn off the tvs left on 24/7 at luxury real estate offices when i go for walks at night, it’s a waste of electricity and the tvs just have a bouncing DVD logo.

          it’s funny, people debate whether tv makes people violent but so far it seems the folks who “think” their tv could get turned off are the ones that are the most violent and name-cally :)

          1. LeoMoon says:

            Um, actually it seemed to make those who think one should have the right to sneakily turn off a tv violently verbally agitated at the suggestion that maybe that’s not a cool thing to do. I think it’s a creative little device, but obnoxious, and if I ever owned a bar and saw someone using it to turn off MY TV, I’d have to get all creative as well and spill a pitcher of beer right on their jacket :-)

          2. Alli Crilly says:

            Have you tried contacting the boss at the office where you are doing this?  He/she might be as surprised as you are to find out the tv’s are left on all night.  Don’t assume that just because one staff member was lazy that this is company policy

          3. Anonymous says:

            they specifically leave the TVs on with a 1 hour DVD playing when they leave, once it’s over it goes to the menu screen it seems and just sits there all night.

          4. Anonymous says:

            they specifically leave the TVs on with a 1 hour DVD playing when they leave, once it’s over it goes to the menu screen it seems and just sits there all night.

          5. Wow I get it you’re a Nazi, so when are we going to start busting in a little children and those energy wasting night-lights. I mean they should buck up, suck-it-up and do what “you” want; screw there fear of the things like you that go bump in the night. Here, here let’s not stop there you should be in control of the electric grid like they did in Russia. Hell what about all those on life support over 60 there gonna die anyway why waste the juice?

          6. Anonymous says:

            @twitter-15570492:disqus calling anyone a “nazi” here gets you banned, do not do it again.

          7. Ben Rushing says:

            So it is ok to trespass on other people’s property beause they are wasting energy by running a DVD player? But flying spaghetti monster forbid that someone actually trepasses on your property and does something that you don’t like. Got to love authoritarians and their double standards when it comes to thier space but not others.

          8. Ben Rushing says:

            So it is ok to trespass on other people’s property beause they are wasting energy by running a DVD player? But flying spaghetti monster forbid that someone actually trepasses on your property and does something that you don’t like. Got to love authoritarians and their double standards when it comes to thier space but not others.

          9. Anonymous says:

            they specifically leave the TVs on with a 1 hour DVD playing when they leave, once it’s over it goes to the menu screen it seems and just sits there all night.

        2. Anonymous says:

          i use a tv-b-gone to turn off the tvs left on 24/7 at luxury real estate offices when i go for walks at night, it’s a waste of electricity and the tvs just have a bouncing DVD logo.

          it’s funny, people debate whether tv makes people violent but so far it seems the folks who “think” their tv could get turned off are the ones that are the most violent and name-cally :)

        3. Anonymous says:

          i use a tv-b-gone to turn off the tvs left on 24/7 at luxury real estate offices when i go for walks at night, it’s a waste of electricity and the tvs just have a bouncing DVD logo.

          it’s funny, people debate whether tv makes people violent but so far it seems the folks who “think” their tv could get turned off are the ones that are the most violent and name-cally :)

        4. Anonymous says:

          i use a tv-b-gone to turn off the tvs left on 24/7 at luxury real estate offices when i go for walks at night, it’s a waste of electricity and the tvs just have a bouncing DVD logo.

          it’s funny, people debate whether tv makes people violent but so far it seems the folks who “think” their tv could get turned off are the ones that are the most violent and name-cally :)

        5. Anonymous says:

          i use a tv-b-gone to turn off the tvs left on 24/7 at luxury real estate offices when i go for walks at night, it’s a waste of electricity and the tvs just have a bouncing DVD logo.

          it’s funny, people debate whether tv makes people violent but so far it seems the folks who “think” their tv could get turned off are the ones that are the most violent and name-cally :)

      3. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      4. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      5. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

        1. YeaSayer says:

          jeez dude have a drink or something

        2. YeaSayer says:

          jeez dude have a drink or something

        3. mwmw75 says:

          The irony of this post boggles the mind.

      6. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      7. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      8. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      9. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      10. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      11. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      12. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      13. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      14. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      15. Precisely.
        Americans who blare sound are spoiled, little babies who never think of anyone but themselves.
        Selfish little adolescent pukes who think the whole world should be forced to listen to their mind-deadening TRIPE.

      16. The Turtle says:

         Here’s the thing:  bars and restaurants are not, and never have been, “public spaces.”  And in those privately-owned spaces, a lot of people actually want to see and hear the television and not put up with control-freak, passive-aggressive crap.  If I owned the places Becky Stern frequents, she’d have exactly five seconds to make it to the door before I physically threw her out and called the police.

      17. The Turtle says:

         Here’s the thing:  bars and restaurants are not, and never have been, “public spaces.”  And in those privately-owned spaces, a lot of people actually want to see and hear the television and not put up with control-freak, passive-aggressive crap.  If I owned the places Becky Stern frequents, she’d have exactly five seconds to make it to the door before I physically threw her out and called the police.

        1. Anonymous says:

          @google-885ddbd61513482f9d268ef1a3541242:disqus i’m pretty sure you can kick anyone out of your privately owned space – i think it would be hard to know who turned on or off the tv though. at this time i do not think there are any laws against using IR signals to turn off a TV, as far as i know the police have never been involved with a tv being turned off (or on) via a tv-b-gone.

          i don’t think you could “physically” touch someone however.

          on a related note, when american apparel was showing looped DVDs of what seemed to be underage coked up girls on the outside of their door modeling it was fun to turn those off, it was being displayed towards a public side walk so that’s a difference example of course.

          1. Ben Rushing says:

            Great, now Christian Conservatives are going to feel entitled to use TV B GONE to turn off whatever content that they don’t like. Freedom is a hated thing, because everyone who feels that they know what is best for everybody (on both the left and right) can never allow it to exist simply because they think that their perogative is meaningful and profound.

          2. Ben Rushing says:

            Great, now Christian Conservatives are going to feel entitled to use TV B GONE to turn off whatever content that they don’t like. Freedom is a hated thing, because everyone who feels that they know what is best for everybody (on both the left and right) can never allow it to exist simply because they think that their perogative is meaningful and profound.

          3. Ben Rushing says:

            Great, now Christian Conservatives are going to feel entitled to use TV B GONE to turn off whatever content that they don’t like. Freedom is a hated thing, because everyone who feels that they know what is best for everybody (on both the left and right) can never allow it to exist simply because they think that their perogative is meaningful and profound.

        2. JamesW says:

          Actually, a bar and/or restaurant IS a “public place.”  It is “private property” but it is a “public” place.  Unless there is a limited membership to said bar and/or restaurant. Like this:  Walmart – public place; Sam’s Club: not so public, since you have to buy a membership to get in the door.

        3. JamesW says:

          Actually, a bar and/or restaurant IS a “public place.”  It is “private property” but it is a “public” place.  Unless there is a limited membership to said bar and/or restaurant. Like this:  Walmart – public place; Sam’s Club: not so public, since you have to buy a membership to get in the door.

      18. Alli Crilly says:

        If you are trying to avoid a distracting tv, why would you go to a restaurant?  There are many distractions. I can’t imagine any situation that would justify infringing on others rights in this way.

        1. Anonymous says:

          @google-f19f93a357b03ee0f42e74d446be6d75:disqus i’ve heard both side of “infringing rights” some people do not believe places like restaurants  / bars should have the right to show tvs without the express permission of each customer. i realize they may want to re-consider where they go. as far as i know there isn’t a law or “right” that guarantees tv access in every location, but who knows – maybe it will be a law one day that says we all need to be X feet away from a tv or something at all times. it’s an interesting debate, the thing that no one ever mentions… why is the tv-b-gone so popular based on the comments it sometimes generates? are people saying they hate it but secretly go out and get these? or are the haters-gonna-hate style comments just a vocal minority?

      19. Anonymous says:

        I agree. I think as an art project (I’m not sure if the designer is thinking about the TV-B-Gone as art, I sure do), TV-B-Gone is a subversive statement questioning how we interact with others in public space as well as how define “public” in space as well as what is acceptable (maybe ethical) conduct in public space. This really makes me think of the Vito Acconci essay Public Space in a Private Time. I think it exposes the duality that exists in many of our so called “public” spaces. I love it! 

      20. Anonymous says:

        I agree. I think as an art project (I’m not sure if the designer is thinking about the TV-B-Gone as art, I sure do), TV-B-Gone is a subversive statement questioning how we interact with others in public space as well as how define “public” in space as well as what is acceptable (maybe ethical) conduct in public space. This really makes me think of the Vito Acconci essay Public Space in a Private Time. I think it exposes the duality that exists in many of our so called “public” spaces. I love it! 

  5. Anonymous says:

    That’s great!  But i guess it would only work in the winter time.  For the summer, maybe you could add it to a purse, using the zipper there.

  6. Anonymous says:

    That’s great!  But i guess it would only work in the winter time.  For the summer, maybe you could add it to a purse, using the zipper there.

  7. Too bad you can’t do this with cell phones.

    1. And car stereos, boomboxes, the neighbor’s sound system….if I can hear it, it’s too loud. Blow out your stupid ear drums by the time you’re 30 if you want to, you worthless little s**t, but stop assaulting mine.

      1. geekd says:

        None of those examples apply here.  The author specifically said “restaurants”

      2. geekd says:

        None of those examples apply here.  The author specifically said “restaurants”

    2. And car stereos, boomboxes, the neighbor’s sound system….if I can hear it, it’s too loud. Blow out your stupid ear drums by the time you’re 30 if you want to, you worthless little s**t, but stop assaulting mine.

    3. And car stereos, boomboxes, the neighbor’s sound system….if I can hear it, it’s too loud. Blow out your stupid ear drums by the time you’re 30 if you want to, you worthless little s**t, but stop assaulting mine.

    4. And car stereos, boomboxes, the neighbor’s sound system….if I can hear it, it’s too loud. Blow out your stupid ear drums by the time you’re 30 if you want to, you worthless little s**t, but stop assaulting mine.

    5. And car stereos, boomboxes, the neighbor’s sound system….if I can hear it, it’s too loud. Blow out your stupid ear drums by the time you’re 30 if you want to, you worthless little s**t, but stop assaulting mine.

  8. geekd says:

    Here’s an idea:  Instead of being a total jerk and turning off TVs that don’t belong to you, how about you just got to a restaurant that doesn’t have a TV on?

    What a controlling bitch.

    1. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    2. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    3. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    4. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    5. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    6. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    7. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

      1. Who is dick-le$$? You spewing profanity and posturing, or the coward deciding what others will or won’t enjoy with hidden technology? Why not just set the device on the table and encourage others to come over and tell you what they think of you deciding for them…. Oh yeah I get it now you’re the dick-le$$ one.

      2. Who is dick-le$$? You spewing profanity and posturing, or the coward deciding what others will or won’t enjoy with hidden technology? Why not just set the device on the table and encourage others to come over and tell you what they think of you deciding for them…. Oh yeah I get it now you’re the dick-le$$ one.

      3. Who is dick-le$$? You spewing profanity and posturing, or the coward deciding what others will or won’t enjoy with hidden technology? Why not just set the device on the table and encourage others to come over and tell you what they think of you deciding for them…. Oh yeah I get it now you’re the dick-le$$ one.

      4. Who is dick-le$$? You spewing profanity and posturing, or the coward deciding what others will or won’t enjoy with hidden technology? Why not just set the device on the table and encourage others to come over and tell you what they think of you deciding for them…. Oh yeah I get it now you’re the dick-le$$ one.

    8. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    9. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    10. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    11. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    12. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    13. Here’s an idea:

      How about I kick your ass, you dickless little puke?

    14. I agree with “geekd”
      who are you to decide what or when others can do anything. When I was
      in college I regularly frequented local establishments just so I could
      see and enjoy a game or a sitcom. Why not develop something that will
      impose our will on others and stop decent oh great overlord?

  9. geekd says:

    Here’s an idea:  Instead of being a total jerk and turning off TVs that don’t belong to you, how about you just got to a restaurant that doesn’t have a TV on?

    What a controlling bitch.

  10. RevBrownNote says:

    Love the idea/tech, but really, just go to a different restaurant.

  11. RevBrownNote says:

    Love the idea/tech, but really, just go to a different restaurant.

  12. RevBrownNote says:

    Love the idea/tech, but really, just go to a different restaurant.

  13. YeaSayer says:

    TVs? In MY bar?

    It’s more likely than you think.

  14. YeaSayer says:

    TVs? In MY bar?

    It’s more likely than you think.

  15. YeaSayer says:

    TVs? In MY bar?

    It’s more likely than you think.

  16. YeaSayer says:

    TVs? In MY bar?

    It’s more likely than you think.

  17. AndrewS says:

    wow!
    a lot of hate for the tv-b-gone!
    and no wonder, because it is simply an arrogant device
    I don’t really see how anyone can defend the use of a tv-be-gone when you are so embarrassed using it you have to hide it in a jacket.
    Just dont take it to an airport i guess.

    1. Anonymous says:

      how can a device be arrogant?

      1. Sasha Sklar says:

        I think he probably meant that its stated use is an arrogant act.

        1. Anonymous says:

          a $25k nap capsule, nice :)

        2. Anonymous says:

          a $25k nap capsule, nice :)

    2. Anonymous says:

      how can a device be arrogant?

  18. AndrewS says:

    wow!
    a lot of hate for the tv-b-gone!
    and no wonder, because it is simply an arrogant device
    I don’t really see how anyone can defend the use of a tv-be-gone when you are so embarrassed using it you have to hide it in a jacket.
    Just dont take it to an airport i guess.

  19. AndrewS says:

    wow!
    a lot of hate for the tv-b-gone!
    and no wonder, because it is simply an arrogant device
    I don’t really see how anyone can defend the use of a tv-be-gone when you are so embarrassed using it you have to hide it in a jacket.
    Just dont take it to an airport i guess.

  20. Rich Mallon says:

    There is no practical reason for you to do this. Most bar and restaurants dont even put the volume up, they rely on closed captioning. You’re just being a prissy smart-ass. There is no need for you to turn the sets off.

    1. Anonymous says:

      hi rich, i’ve used one at a bar when the bartender couldn’t find the remote and the turning it off required a ladder. i’ve also used mine to turn on a tv after the remote died.

      it’s harmless prank at worst, no reason to resort to name calling.

      1. Tell that to the guys from Gawker that got banned for life from CES.

        1. Anonymous says:

          they were allowed back the following year.

          1. WardR says:

            That’s unfortunate.  Their actions were unprofessional, and a detriment to the credibility of honest tech industry bloggers everywhere.  I was disappointed when legal charges weren’t pressed, and now they’re allowed back at the show?  Lame.  Maybe next time they’ll bring wire cutters.

          2. WardR says:

            That’s unfortunate.  Their actions were unprofessional, and a detriment to the credibility of honest tech industry bloggers everywhere.  I was disappointed when legal charges weren’t pressed, and now they’re allowed back at the show?  Lame.  Maybe next time they’ll bring wire cutters.

          3. Anonymous says:

            i’m pretty sure gizmodo would admit they’re not professional or honest some of the time, i’m not sure they’ve ever claimed to be. i think most most people considered it a harmless prank, most/all the outrage was from people commenting on blogs.

          4. Anonymous says:

            i’m pretty sure gizmodo would admit they’re not professional or honest some of the time, i’m not sure they’ve ever claimed to be. i think most most people considered it a harmless prank, most/all the outrage was from people commenting on blogs.

          5. Anonymous says:

            i’m pretty sure gizmodo would admit they’re not professional or honest some of the time, i’m not sure they’ve ever claimed to be. i think most most people considered it a harmless prank, most/all the outrage was from people commenting on blogs.

          6. WardR says:

            That’s unfortunate.  Their actions were unprofessional, and a detriment to the credibility of honest tech industry bloggers everywhere.  I was disappointed when legal charges weren’t pressed, and now they’re allowed back at the show?  Lame.  Maybe next time they’ll bring wire cutters.

          7. WardR says:

            That’s unfortunate.  Their actions were unprofessional, and a detriment to the credibility of honest tech industry bloggers everywhere.  I was disappointed when legal charges weren’t pressed, and now they’re allowed back at the show?  Lame.  Maybe next time they’ll bring wire cutters.

      2. Rich Mallon says:

        It’s not the technology I have a problem with. It’s the way the author was using it. You are using it with either the bartender’s permission or for yourself. You’re not imposing your will against the other patrons’ choice. Against the wishes of the owner as well. Yes, it’s harmless, but it violates Jim Jeffries’ first commandment: “Don’t be a cunt”

      3. Rich Mallon says:

        It’s not the technology I have a problem with. It’s the way the author was using it. You are using it with either the bartender’s permission or for yourself. You’re not imposing your will against the other patrons’ choice. Against the wishes of the owner as well. Yes, it’s harmless, but it violates Jim Jeffries’ first commandment: “Don’t be a cunt”

      4. Rich Mallon says:

        It’s not the technology I have a problem with. It’s the way the author was using it. You are using it with either the bartender’s permission or for yourself. You’re not imposing your will against the other patrons’ choice. Against the wishes of the owner as well. Yes, it’s harmless, but it violates Jim Jeffries’ first commandment: “Don’t be a cunt”

    2. Anonymous says:

      hi rich, i’ve used one at a bar when the bartender couldn’t find the remote and the turning it off required a ladder. i’ve also used mine to turn on a tv after the remote died.

      it’s harmless prank at worst, no reason to resort to name calling.

  21. Rich Mallon says:

    There is no practical reason for you to do this. Most bar and restaurants dont even put the volume up, they rely on closed captioning. You’re just being a prissy smart-ass. There is no need for you to turn the sets off.

  22. Rich Mallon says:

    There is no practical reason for you to do this. Most bar and restaurants dont even put the volume up, they rely on closed captioning. You’re just being a prissy smart-ass. There is no need for you to turn the sets off.

  23. Rich Mallon says:

    There is no practical reason for you to do this. Most bar and restaurants dont even put the volume up, they rely on closed captioning. You’re just being a prissy smart-ass. There is no need for you to turn the sets off.

  24. Rich Mallon says:

    There is no practical reason for you to do this. Most bar and restaurants dont even put the volume up, they rely on closed captioning. You’re just being a prissy smart-ass. There is no need for you to turn the sets off.

  25. Bob R Kenyon says:

    You guys did this three years ago: http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2008/09/tvbgone-hoodie.html

  26. Bob R Kenyon says:

    You guys did this three years ago: http://blog.makezine.com/archive/2008/09/tvbgone-hoodie.html

    1. Becky Stern says:

      Yes but not a video! =]

    2. Becky Stern says:

      Yes but not a video! =]

    3. Becky Stern says:

      Yes but not a video! =]

  27. Anonymous says:

    I want one to turn off cell phones

    1. Anonymous says:

      turning off cell phones is possible, it’s not legal in some countries – but it raises interesting social questions just like the tv-g-gone does. what is public space? does loud cell phone talking and tvs everywhere belong? these are just some of the fascinating questions raised with a “design noir” type project like the tv-b-gone.

      1. Anonymous says:

        I think cell phones do not belong in the movie theater. People think because it’s public space that they can turn their car radio up full blast. What about my right to peace? I think what it really boils down to courtesy, which many people are completely oblivious to.

    2. Anonymous says:

      turning off cell phones is possible, it’s not legal in some countries – but it raises interesting social questions just like the tv-g-gone does. what is public space? does loud cell phone talking and tvs everywhere belong? these are just some of the fascinating questions raised with a “design noir” type project like the tv-b-gone.

    3. Anonymous says:

      turning off cell phones is possible, it’s not legal in some countries – but it raises interesting social questions just like the tv-g-gone does. what is public space? does loud cell phone talking and tvs everywhere belong? these are just some of the fascinating questions raised with a “design noir” type project like the tv-b-gone.

    4. Anonymous says:

      turning off cell phones is possible, it’s not legal in some countries – but it raises interesting social questions just like the tv-g-gone does. what is public space? does loud cell phone talking and tvs everywhere belong? these are just some of the fascinating questions raised with a “design noir” type project like the tv-b-gone.

  28. Anonymous says:

    I want one to turn off cell phones

  29. Anonymous says:

    I want one to turn off cell phones

  30. Alli Crilly says:

    I’m a restaurant manager.  Doing this in my restaurant would result in me wasting hours of company time trying to find the problem with our tv set, and probably 1/2 dozen complaints from regular customers who couldn’t hear the game, not to mention the time I could have spent doing my actual job and supporting the staff instead of running around on an entitled hipster’s wild goose chase.

    Why on earth would you do this to the restaurant staff?  If you really hate them that much, go to another restaurant, one that doesn’t have a tv. They do exist.  Our policy is actually to keep the tv’s on mute unless a guest requests to hear a big game or special event (the last one was Obama’s inauguration, despite being in Canada.)  Maybe if you bothered to talk to the staff, make your objections to the tv clear, discuss with management why you think they would be better off without it, you might even have made a positive difference in your community.

    Instead you chose to spend hours and money on pissing in the face of minimum wage slaves who’s names and faces you forget within minutes.  Good luck getting a table in any restaurant for, oh, the next 10 years or so.  And good luck to the staff that is unfortunate enough to have to deal with your bullshit for the night.  As I and my staff say at least 20 times a day “they don’t pay me enough to deal with this shit.”

  31. Anonymous says:

    If you zip your jacket back up does it turn the TVs back on?? (I fear for your warmth)

  32. Wendy Kaufman says:

    hmmm, as a mom, I’d love one of these. There is a sushi restaurant my family likes, but we never go there because of the TV. We stopped because they were showing non-family friendly movies, and when we asked for the blood and guts channel to be turned off, they did change it, to pretty much another blood and guts movie. It’s a shame, because they have the best sushi around. Yes, there is another shop, but not nearly as good. Love to be able to go again and know that the kids won’t be staring at the tube,–ad be assured that if it is on, that I can be sure it’s not showing inappropriate movies.

  33. Wendy Kaufman says:

    hmmm, as a mom, I’d love one of these. There is a sushi restaurant my family likes, but we never go there because of the TV. We stopped because they were showing non-family friendly movies, and when we asked for the blood and guts channel to be turned off, they did change it, to pretty much another blood and guts movie. It’s a shame, because they have the best sushi around. Yes, there is another shop, but not nearly as good. Love to be able to go again and know that the kids won’t be staring at the tube,–ad be assured that if it is on, that I can be sure it’s not showing inappropriate movies.

    1. Ben Rushing says:

      Solution, learn to get take out. Or learn to prepare sushi at home. The sushi restraunt would probobly need more instruction, but ultimately in a free market society, the choice of what to show is theirs. Ultimately, if people don’t like it, the place will fail to turn a profit and go out of business. The first rule of business is that the majority of customers is always right. If you aren’t in the majority… Oh well. 

    2. Ben Rushing says:

      Solution, learn to get take out. Or learn to prepare sushi at home. The sushi restraunt would probobly need more instruction, but ultimately in a free market society, the choice of what to show is theirs. Ultimately, if people don’t like it, the place will fail to turn a profit and go out of business. The first rule of business is that the majority of customers is always right. If you aren’t in the majority… Oh well. 

    3. Ben Rushing says:

      Solution, learn to get take out. Or learn to prepare sushi at home. The sushi restraunt would probobly need more instruction, but ultimately in a free market society, the choice of what to show is theirs. Ultimately, if people don’t like it, the place will fail to turn a profit and go out of business. The first rule of business is that the majority of customers is always right. If you aren’t in the majority… Oh well. 

    4. Ben Rushing says:

      Solution, learn to get take out. Or learn to prepare sushi at home. The sushi restraunt would probobly need more instruction, but ultimately in a free market society, the choice of what to show is theirs. Ultimately, if people don’t like it, the place will fail to turn a profit and go out of business. The first rule of business is that the majority of customers is always right. If you aren’t in the majority… Oh well. 

  34. Wendy Kaufman says:

    hmmm, as a mom, I’d love one of these. There is a sushi restaurant my family likes, but we never go there because of the TV. We stopped because they were showing non-family friendly movies, and when we asked for the blood and guts channel to be turned off, they did change it, to pretty much another blood and guts movie. It’s a shame, because they have the best sushi around. Yes, there is another shop, but not nearly as good. Love to be able to go again and know that the kids won’t be staring at the tube,–ad be assured that if it is on, that I can be sure it’s not showing inappropriate movies.

  35. Wendy Kaufman says:

    hmmm, as a mom, I’d love one of these. There is a sushi restaurant my family likes, but we never go there because of the TV. We stopped because they were showing non-family friendly movies, and when we asked for the blood and guts channel to be turned off, they did change it, to pretty much another blood and guts movie. It’s a shame, because they have the best sushi around. Yes, there is another shop, but not nearly as good. Love to be able to go again and know that the kids won’t be staring at the tube,–ad be assured that if it is on, that I can be sure it’s not showing inappropriate movies.

  36. reggie says:

    Michael, many people choose to frequent a place *because* they anticipate (based on how the place advertises itself and/or past experience)
    that at that particular time, there will be at least one TV on which will predictably be showing
    something that they actually want to see. 

    I should say “probably”
    because of course another event on TV might pre-empt what they hoped to
    see.  That choice is ultimately up to the owner of the establishment
    that bought the TVs, pays the bills, employs the staff, buys the raw materials for the food and drink, and chooses whether or not to serve any particular customer (no, it’s not your right, it’s their right to choose).  Makes sense – right?

    Unless of course someone like Becky decides that what she wants
    is categorically more important than the desires of: 
    - the owner(s),
    - the
    manager(s),
    - the staff, and
    - the paying patrons (with of course the exception of Becky)

    You see, through the magic of technology, Becky (who is obviously the most important patron) is endowed — through her special “make” abilities — to dictate whether or not the owner/manager can operate a profitable business at the same staffing level compared to a universe where magical “make”-bunny Becky lives.

    Oh noes!  Too bad waiter, bus person and dishwasher — but rest happy knowing that Becky enjoyed her meal in relative silence!

    I get it — it’s annoying to be someplace when you don’t want to be distracted by the TV.  That’s natural.

    Dictating how other people get to enjoy a space that they voluntarily
    chose to be in, well…  that’s just selfish, and inconsiderate of
    others.

  37. reggie says:

    Michael, many people choose to frequent a place *because* they anticipate (based on how the place advertises itself and/or past experience) that at that particular time, there will be at least one TV on which will predictably be showing something that they actually want to see. 

    I should say “probably” because of course another event on TV might pre-empt what they hoped to
    see.  That choice is ultimately up to the owner of the establishment that bought the TVs, pays the bills, employs the staff, buys the raw materials for the food and drink, and chooses whether or not to serve
    any particular customer (no, it’s not your right, it’s their right to choose).  Makes sense – right?

    Unless of course someone like Becky decides that what she wants is categorically more important than the desires of: 
    - the owner(s),
    - the manager(s),
    - the staff, and
    - the paying patrons (with of course the exception of Becky)

    You see, through the magic of technology, Becky (who is obviously the most important patron) is endowed — through her special “make” abilities — to dictate whether or not the owner/manager can operate a profitable business at the same staffing level compared to a universe where magical “make”-bunny Becky lives.

    Oh noes!  Too bad waiter, bus person and dishwasher — but rest happy knowing that Becky enjoyed her meal in relative silence!

    I get it — it’s annoying to be someplace when you don’t want to be distracted by the TV.  That’s natural.

    Dictating how other people get to enjoy a space that they voluntarily chose to be in, well…  that’s just selfish, and inconsiderate of others.

  38. Anonymous says:

    @ptorrone:disqus , it’s the choice of the business owner whether they leave their TVs on 24/7, not yours to make, if you are concerned phone them up and tell them they’ve left their tvs on.
    I think it is a funny prank as I’ve seen clandestine videos of this being used at trade shows.

    However the restaurant managers do have a point, it shouldn’t be you to take it upon yourselves to turn these TVs off without permission. Ask to be seated at a table where the TV isn’t a distraction.

    However some of the comments I have seen here, I would expect to seen below youtube videos. If you are going to comment, don’t be rude and swear at people you don’t even know.

  39. Anonymous says:

    @ptorrone:disqus , it’s the choice of the business owner whether they leave their TVs on 24/7, not yours to make, if you are concerned phone them up and tell them they’ve left their tvs on.
    I think it is a funny prank as I’ve seen clandestine videos of this being used at trade shows.

    However the restaurant managers do have a point, it shouldn’t be you to take it upon yourselves to turn these TVs off without permission. Ask to be seated at a table where the TV isn’t a distraction.

    However some of the comments I have seen here, I would expect to seen below youtube videos. If you are going to comment, don’t be rude and swear at people you don’t even know.

  40. Anonymous says:

    After much thought, I feel that the fundamental reason for my dislike of this is similar to my dislike of graffitti: 

    The ‘Artist’ that does the action is incredibly self centered, and has little or no regard for the property of others. The ‘artist’ feels that their wants are paramount, and trump others’ rights to do what they want with what they own. 

    Similar to the whole debate over ‘I own it, I can do what I want with it’ discussion about Sony products. The restaurant/business owns their TV’s, they have the ‘right’ to use them (legally!) as they see fit. If you do not like their use of their possessions, don’t patronize them. Or object via phone, email, forums,picketing, etc.

    Taking matters into your own hands, disregarding the ‘rights’ of the owner, and doing what you want with their stuff is not correct, IMO. 

  41. Anonymous says:

    After much thought, I feel that the fundamental reason for my dislike of this is similar to my dislike of graffitti: 

    The ‘Artist’ that does the action is incredibly self centered, and has little or no regard for the property of others. The ‘artist’ feels that their wants are paramount, and trump others’ rights to do what they want with what they own. 

    Similar to the whole debate over ‘I own it, I can do what I want with it’ discussion about Sony products. The restaurant/business owns their TV’s, they have the ‘right’ to use them (legally!) as they see fit. If you do not like their use of their possessions, don’t patronize them. Or object via phone, email, forums,picketing, etc.

    Taking matters into your own hands, disregarding the ‘rights’ of the owner, and doing what you want with their stuff is not correct, IMO. 

    1. Anonymous says:

      @Volkemon:disqus i’m not sure graffiti is the same for me. on one hand it’s a permanent change that is damaging, while turning on or off a tv isn’t. while some view graffiti as always bad, others celebrate it and feature it in museums. if you look at banksy’s work it’s humorous, political and extremely valuable (selling in the millions).

      it’s really more about what is socially acceptable at any given time.

      the tv-b-gone in my mind makes us think about our relationships to public spaces, tvs and what’s ok or not ok for someone to do.

      1. Anonymous says:

        “…i’m not sure graffiti is the same for me. on one hand it’s a permanent change that is damaging…”
        - a position I also hold, and it has distressed me to see graffiti machines and activities promoted in the MAKEblog. 
        The artistic value and monetary value of the graffiti notwithstanding. 

        “the tv-b-gone in my mind makes us think about our relationships to public spaces, tvs and what’s ok or not ok for someone to do.”     - indeed. The genesis for my post. :)  

        One can obfuscate simple ideas by drawing in other true, but not pertinent facts. I am addressing the simple fact that I feel the use promoted here of this device is contrary to the *owner* of a device not being able to use their own device as they (again, legally) want to. 

      2. Anonymous says:

        “…i’m not sure graffiti is the same for me. on one hand it’s a permanent change that is damaging…”
        - a position I also hold, and it has distressed me to see graffiti machines and activities promoted in the MAKEblog. 
        The artistic value and monetary value of the graffiti notwithstanding. 

        “the tv-b-gone in my mind makes us think about our relationships to public spaces, tvs and what’s ok or not ok for someone to do.”     - indeed. The genesis for my post. :)  

        One can obfuscate simple ideas by drawing in other true, but not pertinent facts. I am addressing the simple fact that I feel the use promoted here of this device is contrary to the *owner* of a device not being able to use their own device as they (again, legally) want to. 

      3. By your reasoning I could assault you assuring you were not permanently disfigured and force you to site there while I went on some diatribe about property rights and then let you go? Would you not be left with permanent psychological damage after such an event? I feel tyhe same way when some one throws there political crap on a wall I am forced to endure while waiting for a red light. But I want “them” to be able to do it, just not decide for me.

        This is hyperbole and does not take into account for your personal freedom but who is to decide what’s inappropriate? You already would allow an “artist” to “in a social acceptable way” do what the artist wishes at any time, in the name of something you subscribe to as art. Additionaly these same douches that “spend millions” on “extremely valuable” political statements (ideology) could be ensuring the education and artistic exportation for an entire generation with that money spend it on works that will never foster anything but a fleeting glimpse of what a human can do.

        PS Moderator(s) its ok for me to write this I’m am a digital artist.( See ptorrone for his explanation as to why its OK for artists to do and say what they wish)

        1. Anonymous says:

          @sorrowpain:disqus i don’t see how physical assault and turning off or on a tv are the same thing. i didn’t say artists can do and say what they wish, but if i had to chose artists pushing the boundaries or being killed or silenced, i’d chose the first.

          1. Anonymous says:

            (from a couple posts ago) “it’s really more about what is socially acceptable at any given time” - indeed. I feel it is NOT socially acceptable for an ‘artist’ to determine what will be done with others property, without the owners’ consent. The degrading of society to a point where it is acceptable is not a happy thought for me. 
            The TV-b-gone is not ‘bad’ in and of itself. No more than a can of spray paint, or a marker. But even Becky implies that the use she is promoting is not proper -”Whenever I bring my TV-B-Gone out to restaurants, I look suspicious pointing it around. So I embedded the device into a jacket and turned it into a wearable TV silencer”Suspicious? Yes, you are denying the owner of a TV the right to use it as they want to. And you are correct to note that. There are proper responses, such as asking to have the TV turned off, or not patronizing that business. Write a letter to the owners. Get the appropriate permits, and picket outside the business to make others aware of their objectionable use of the TV’s. But taking matters into your own hands and denying the free use of a device by its owner, is wrong IMO. 
            Referring to the post by Alli Crilly  up above, there may even be legal ramifications to this use! Say an ‘artist’ makes this clandestine TV B Gone, and uses it in the restaurant they frequent. Each time they are there, TV problems are noted, service calls are set up, employee time is misused, and other costs may be incurred by the owner. After a few times, an employee notes the link between the ‘artist’s’ zipper pulls and the TV outages, and the ‘artist’ is confronted.  I feel that it would be proper for the owner to trespass them from the property for interruption of their business activities, and take the ‘artist’ to civil court to recover the costs incurred by the corrective measures. Should the owner be sufficiently PO’d , they may present an argument that their business suffered lower traffic from having a reputation of unreliable TV operation, and sue the ‘artist’ for the lost revenue. Heck, even the MAKEblog may share some responsibility being that they are purposefully promoting this use of the TV B Gone.  Yes, this is unlikely, but but I feel it would be a valid case. At the least, it would be time consuming and expensive for the ‘artist’ to defend against. Do this on Disney property, for example, and the legal firestorm could be amazing!
             BTW- I am referring to the USA legal system and laws. Other countries may have greater or lesser penalties and differing ways for business owners to prosecute. 
            My point remains without response from you, PT. I would welcome a response from Becky also :)  - I am presenting the simple idea that the use promoted here of this device is contrary to the rights of the owner of another device being able to use their own device as they (legally) want to.

          2. Anonymous says:

            interesting points, i think the tv-b-gone once again has raised many questions about public spaces ;)

          3. Anonymous says:

            interesting points, i think the tv-b-gone once again has raised many questions about public spaces ;)

          4. Anonymous says:

            interesting points, i think the tv-b-gone once again has raised many questions about public spaces ;)

          5. Becky Stern says:

            Thanks for writing, Volk, I appreciate your points.  What I’m condoning here is a little bit of creative mischief. Like PT, I have never seen any legal cases regarding a tv-b-gone.

            FWIW, while filming, I had the total consent and eager participation of the
            bartender, whose afternoon was looking pretty boring otherwise. She dug the device, and her first idea for a spinoff is to turn all TVs to the game’s channel (just a little reprogramming required).
             

        2. Anonymous says:

          @sorrowpain:disqus i don’t see how physical assault and turning off or on a tv are the same thing. i didn’t say artists can do and say what they wish, but if i had to chose artists pushing the boundaries or being killed or silenced, i’d chose the first.

        3. Anonymous says:

          @sorrowpain:disqus i don’t see how physical assault and turning off or on a tv are the same thing. i didn’t say artists can do and say what they wish, but if i had to chose artists pushing the boundaries or being killed or silenced, i’d chose the first.

        4. Anonymous says:

          @sorrowpain:disqus i don’t see how physical assault and turning off or on a tv are the same thing. i didn’t say artists can do and say what they wish, but if i had to chose artists pushing the boundaries or being killed or silenced, i’d chose the first.

    2. Anonymous says:

      @Volkemon:disqus i’m not sure graffiti is the same for me. on one hand it’s a permanent change that is damaging, while turning on or off a tv isn’t. while some view graffiti as always bad, others celebrate it and feature it in museums. if you look at banksy’s work it’s humorous, political and extremely valuable (selling in the millions).

      it’s really more about what is socially acceptable at any given time.

      the tv-b-gone in my mind makes us think about our relationships to public spaces, tvs and what’s ok or not ok for someone to do.

    3. Anonymous says:

      @Volkemon:disqus i’m not sure graffiti is the same for me. on one hand it’s a permanent change that is damaging, while turning on or off a tv isn’t. while some view graffiti as always bad, others celebrate it and feature it in museums. if you look at banksy’s work it’s humorous, political and extremely valuable (selling in the millions).

      it’s really more about what is socially acceptable at any given time.

      the tv-b-gone in my mind makes us think about our relationships to public spaces, tvs and what’s ok or not ok for someone to do.

    4. Anonymous says:

      @Volkemon:disqus i’m not sure graffiti is the same for me. on one hand it’s a permanent change that is damaging, while turning on or off a tv isn’t. while some view graffiti as always bad, others celebrate it and feature it in museums. if you look at banksy’s work it’s humorous, political and extremely valuable (selling in the millions).

      it’s really more about what is socially acceptable at any given time.

      the tv-b-gone in my mind makes us think about our relationships to public spaces, tvs and what’s ok or not ok for someone to do.

    5. Anonymous says:

      @Volkemon:disqus i’m not sure graffiti is the same for me. on one hand it’s a permanent change that is damaging, while turning on or off a tv isn’t. while some view graffiti as always bad, others celebrate it and feature it in museums. if you look at banksy’s work it’s humorous, political and extremely valuable (selling in the millions).

      it’s really more about what is socially acceptable at any given time.

      the tv-b-gone in my mind makes us think about our relationships to public spaces, tvs and what’s ok or not ok for someone to do.

    6. Anonymous says:

      @Volkemon:disqus i’m not sure graffiti is the same for me. on one hand it’s a permanent change that is damaging, while turning on or off a tv isn’t. while some view graffiti as always bad, others celebrate it and feature it in museums. if you look at banksy’s work it’s humorous, political and extremely valuable (selling in the millions).

      it’s really more about what is socially acceptable at any given time.

      the tv-b-gone in my mind makes us think about our relationships to public spaces, tvs and what’s ok or not ok for someone to do.

  42. Anonymous says:

    After much thought, I feel that the fundamental reason for my dislike of this is similar to my dislike of graffitti: 

    The ‘Artist’ that does the action is incredibly self centered, and has little or no regard for the property of others. The ‘artist’ feels that their wants are paramount, and trump others’ rights to do what they want with what they own. 

    Similar to the whole debate over ‘I own it, I can do what I want with it’ discussion about Sony products. The restaurant/business owns their TV’s, they have the ‘right’ to use them (legally!) as they see fit. If you do not like their use of their possessions, don’t patronize them. Or object via phone, email, forums,picketing, etc.

    Taking matters into your own hands, disregarding the ‘rights’ of the owner, and doing what you want with their stuff is not correct, IMO. 

  43. Thanks for the reminder to cover the IR sensors with e-tape when I install TV’s. Though as an AV tech I wouldn’t mind a few more $50 service calls because of these devices. At the same time trying to connect these devices to what happened could drive me a little nuts.

    The TV’s in bars don’t really bother me much, the volume of the TV’s and music drives me nuts. I’ve actually unplugged speakers because they were too loud and/or too close to the table. Too bad a simple device like this can’t turn down the music. It sucks to go into a pub and have to yell at the person 3 feet away because the music is too loud.

  44. Thanks for the reminder to cover the IR sensors with e-tape when I install TV’s. Though as an AV tech I wouldn’t mind a few more $50 service calls because of these devices. At the same time trying to connect these devices to what happened could drive me a little nuts.

    The TV’s in bars don’t really bother me much, the volume of the TV’s and music drives me nuts. I’ve actually unplugged speakers because they were too loud and/or too close to the table. Too bad a simple device like this can’t turn down the music. It sucks to go into a pub and have to yell at the person 3 feet away because the music is too loud.

  45. Nice job.   You’re very talented. Now you can get to work on the “selfish jerk-b-gone” device to stop people from forcing their will on others.  You know why there are so many restaurants? So you have a choice.  If you don’t like TVs, go somewhere else! Try repurposing your invention.  It may have a sensible use.

  46. Nice job.   You’re very talented. Now you can get to work on the “selfish jerk-b-gone” device to stop people from forcing their will on others.  You know why there are so many restaurants? So you have a choice.  If you don’t like TVs, go somewhere else! Try repurposing your invention.  It may have a sensible use.

  47. I think it’d work better with a button in the pocket that flashed the IR to the TV.  Way less suspicious than squaring your shoulders up to every TV as you frantically zip, unzip, rezip, etc your jacket.

    As for is it selfish?  This might be just as bad to the poor fella trying to watch the last 5 minutes of the game, but I’d kind of like a version that you could program to flash the IR pulses that will change the TV to the local Discovery channel.  Usually restaurants have tons of TVs and I’d hope nobody would mind if I commandeered the smaller one in the corner to watch Mythbusters.

  48. I think it’d work better with a button in the pocket that flashed the IR to the TV.  Way less suspicious than squaring your shoulders up to every TV as you frantically zip, unzip, rezip, etc your jacket.

    As for is it selfish?  This might be just as bad to the poor fella trying to watch the last 5 minutes of the game, but I’d kind of like a version that you could program to flash the IR pulses that will change the TV to the local Discovery channel.  Usually restaurants have tons of TVs and I’d hope nobody would mind if I commandeered the smaller one in the corner to watch Mythbusters.

  49. SuperTech says:

    Keep up the GOOD WORK.
    There is a reason they call it a boob tube.
    Sounds like all the boobs have been aroused.
    Restaurants should focus on good food and promote family together time, not more distractions as TV.

  50. SuperTech says:

    Keep up the GOOD WORK.
    There is a reason they call it a boob tube.
    Sounds like all the boobs have been aroused.
    Restaurants should focus on good food and promote family together time, not more distractions as TV.

  51. Anonymous says:

    Where I would really like to use this jacket is in airports! Sitting in a waiting area for a flight, there are often TVs blaring CNN, Fox or some other channel…I dislike being assaulted by TVs in airports and would LOVE this device there. 

  52. Anonymous says:

    Where I would really like to use this jacket is in airports! Sitting in a waiting area for a flight, there are often TVs blaring CNN, Fox or some other channel…I dislike being assaulted by TVs in airports and would LOVE this device there. 

  53. Anonymous says:

    I would LOVE to have this spiffy little device in airports. You don’t have a choice when waiting at a gate and they have CNN, FOX, etc. blaring at the top of the dial. Music on a headset doesn’t even drown it out AND you can’t hear the gate announcements over it. ZAP!

  54. Anonymous says:

    I wonder how Becky, and everyone else who likes using this little device would like it if someone had a similar device that blocked their wifi access at their local coffee shop they frequented. Because someone else doesn’t like being annoyed by all of the computer screens in their otherwise tranquil little coffee shop experience.

    And while we are exploring how one person imposes their will on others for their own enjoyment or social opinion, what would you say to a little something that kills your car whenever I feel like there are too many cars moving around me? I could just point my jacket at your car and turn it off. It will turn back on when you try to restart it, but I can just turn it off again. It doesn’t damage your car, so “no harm, no foul” right? Because when I go for a walk down the street, I don’t like having all of those moving cars around me! And by your logic, my right to a peaceful walk next to a STREET made for CARS, is more important than your right to drive down said street.

    Seriously, don’t be a chicken shit if you want to use this device! Have the balls to let everyone aroound you, including the owner of the restaurant, that you are the one turning off the tv. Don’t like seeing or listening to a tv while you eat…stay the fuck home, where you have the right to make that decision! Don’t go to someones place of business, especially a place that may rely in part on those tv’s to bring in business, and turn them off using a chicken shit device.

    1. Anonymous says:

      @1hihum:disqus blocking wifi access would fall under “illegal” while the tv-b-gone at this time does not. i don’t think a device that “kills cars” is the same as a device that turns on or off tvs.

    2. Anonymous says:

      @1hihum:disqus blocking wifi access would fall under “illegal” while the tv-b-gone at this time does not. i don’t think a device that “kills cars” is the same as a device that turns on or off tvs.

    3. Anonymous says:

      @1hihum:disqus blocking wifi access would fall under “illegal” while the tv-b-gone at this time does not. i don’t think a device that “kills cars” is the same as a device that turns on or off tvs.

    4. Anonymous says:

      @1hihum:disqus blocking wifi access would fall under “illegal” while the tv-b-gone at this time does not. i don’t think a device that “kills cars” is the same as a device that turns on or off tvs.

    5. Anonymous says:

      @1hihum:disqus blocking wifi access would fall under “illegal” while the tv-b-gone at this time does not. i don’t think a device that “kills cars” is the same as a device that turns on or off tvs.

      1. Anonymous says:

        You are right, but the principle idea is the same. I impose my will on those around me, including the business/home/car owner… “secretly so as to not incure the wrath of those I piss off, simply because they are not conforming to what I feel is correct. I have little issue with some uses of this device, such as you mentioned; turning off tv’s left on over night by businesses (though that sometimes serves as advertisement for them, and thereby can suffer a loss of potential business by your actions). But to go to a place of business and turn off the tv so as “enjoy” your meal at the expense of others, an potential business to the owner is just flat out wrong. I get the whole practical joke thing, an really that is of little issue to me as well. My issue is with the intended use of the OP.

      2. Anonymous says:

        You are right, but the principle idea is the same. I impose my will on those around me, including the business/home/car owner… “secretly so as to not incure the wrath of those I piss off, simply because they are not conforming to what I feel is correct. I have little issue with some uses of this device, such as you mentioned; turning off tv’s left on over night by businesses (though that sometimes serves as advertisement for them, and thereby can suffer a loss of potential business by your actions). But to go to a place of business and turn off the tv so as “enjoy” your meal at the expense of others, an potential business to the owner is just flat out wrong. I get the whole practical joke thing, an really that is of little issue to me as well. My issue is with the intended use of the OP.

      3. Anonymous says:

        You are right, but the principle idea is the same. I impose my will on those around me, including the business/home/car owner… “secretly so as to not incure the wrath of those I piss off, simply because they are not conforming to what I feel is correct. I have little issue with some uses of this device, such as you mentioned; turning off tv’s left on over night by businesses (though that sometimes serves as advertisement for them, and thereby can suffer a loss of potential business by your actions). But to go to a place of business and turn off the tv so as “enjoy” your meal at the expense of others, an potential business to the owner is just flat out wrong. I get the whole practical joke thing, an really that is of little issue to me as well. My issue is with the intended use of the OP.

      4. Anonymous says:

        You are right, but the principle idea is the same. I impose my will on those around me, including the business/home/car owner… “secretly so as to not incure the wrath of those I piss off, simply because they are not conforming to what I feel is correct. I have little issue with some uses of this device, such as you mentioned; turning off tv’s left on over night by businesses (though that sometimes serves as advertisement for them, and thereby can suffer a loss of potential business by your actions). But to go to a place of business and turn off the tv so as “enjoy” your meal at the expense of others, an potential business to the owner is just flat out wrong. I get the whole practical joke thing, an really that is of little issue to me as well. My issue is with the intended use of the OP.

  55. Anonymous says:

    I wonder how Becky, and everyone else who likes using this little device would like it if someone had a similar device that blocked their wifi access at their local coffee shop they frequented. Because someone else doesn’t like being annoyed by all of the computer screens in their otherwise tranquil little coffee shop experience.

    And while we are exploring how one person imposes their will on others for their own enjoyment or social opinion, what would you say to a little something that kills your car whenever I feel like there are too many cars moving around me? I could just point my jacket at your car and turn it off. It will turn back on when you try to restart it, but I can just turn it off again. It doesn’t damage your car, so “no harm, no foul” right? Because when I go for a walk down the street, I don’t like having all of those moving cars around me! And by your logic, my right to a peaceful walk next to a STREET made for CARS, is more important than your right to drive down said street.

    Seriously, don’t be a chicken shit if you want to use this device! Have the balls to let everyone aroound you, including the owner of the restaurant, that you are the one turning off the tv. Don’t like seeing or listening to a tv while you eat…stay the fuck home, where you have the right to make that decision! Don’t go to someones place of business, especially a place that may rely in part on those tv’s to bring in business, and turn them off using a chicken shit device.

  56. Anonymous says:

    I wonder how Becky, and everyone else who likes using this little device would like it if someone had a similar device that blocked their wifi access at their local coffee shop they frequented. Because someone else doesn’t like being annoyed by all of the computer screens in their otherwise tranquil little coffee shop experience.

    And while we are exploring how one person imposes their will on others for their own enjoyment or social opinion, what would you say to a little something that kills your car whenever I feel like there are too many cars moving around me? I could just point my jacket at your car and turn it off. It will turn back on when you try to restart it, but I can just turn it off again. It doesn’t damage your car, so “no harm, no foul” right? Because when I go for a walk down the street, I don’t like having all of those moving cars around me! And by your logic, my right to a peaceful walk next to a STREET made for CARS, is more important than your right to drive down said street.

    Seriously, don’t be a chicken shit if you want to use this device! Have the balls to let everyone aroound you, including the owner of the restaurant, that you are the one turning off the tv. Don’t like seeing or listening to a tv while you eat…stay the fuck home, where you have the right to make that decision! Don’t go to someones place of business, especially a place that may rely in part on those tv’s to bring in business, and turn them off using a chicken shit device.

  57. Anonymous says:

    I wonder how Becky, and everyone else who likes using this little device would like it if someone had a similar device that blocked their wifi access at their local coffee shop they frequented. Because someone else doesn’t like being annoyed by all of the computer screens in their otherwise tranquil little coffee shop experience.

    And while we are exploring how one person imposes their will on others for their own enjoyment or social opinion, what would you say to a little something that kills your car whenever I feel like there are too many cars moving around me? I could just point my jacket at your car and turn it off. It will turn back on when you try to restart it, but I can just turn it off again. It doesn’t damage your car, so “no harm, no foul” right? Because when I go for a walk down the street, I don’t like having all of those moving cars around me! And by your logic, my right to a peaceful walk next to a STREET made for CARS, is more important than your right to drive down said street.

    Seriously, don’t be a chicken shit if you want to use this device! Have the balls to let everyone aroound you, including the owner of the restaurant, that you are the one turning off the tv. Don’t like seeing or listening to a tv while you eat…stay the fuck home, where you have the right to make that decision! Don’t go to someones place of business, especially a place that may rely in part on those tv’s to bring in business, and turn them off using a chicken shit device.

  58. Anonymous says:

    I wonder how Becky, and everyone else who likes using this little device would like it if someone had a similar device that blocked their wifi access at their local coffee shop they frequented. Because someone else doesn’t like being annoyed by all of the computer screens in their otherwise tranquil little coffee shop experience.

    And while we are exploring how one person imposes their will on others for their own enjoyment or social opinion, what would you say to a little something that kills your car whenever I feel like there are too many cars moving around me? I could just point my jacket at your car and turn it off. It will turn back on when you try to restart it, but I can just turn it off again. It doesn’t damage your car, so “no harm, no foul” right? Because when I go for a walk down the street, I don’t like having all of those moving cars around me! And by your logic, my right to a peaceful walk next to a STREET made for CARS, is more important than your right to drive down said street.

    Seriously, don’t be a chicken shit if you want to use this device! Have the balls to let everyone aroound you, including the owner of the restaurant, that you are the one turning off the tv. Don’t like seeing or listening to a tv while you eat…stay the fuck home, where you have the right to make that decision! Don’t go to someones place of business, especially a place that may rely in part on those tv’s to bring in business, and turn them off using a chicken shit device.

  59. Anonymous says:

    I wonder how Becky, and everyone else who likes using this little device would like it if someone had a similar device that blocked their wifi access at their local coffee shop they frequented. Because someone else doesn’t like being annoyed by all of the computer screens in their otherwise tranquil little coffee shop experience.

    And while we are exploring how one person imposes their will on others for their own enjoyment or social opinion, what would you say to a little something that kills your car whenever I feel like there are too many cars moving around me? I could just point my jacket at your car and turn it off. It will turn back on when you try to restart it, but I can just turn it off again. It doesn’t damage your car, so “no harm, no foul” right? Because when I go for a walk down the street, I don’t like having all of those moving cars around me! And by your logic, my right to a peaceful walk next to a STREET made for CARS, is more important than your right to drive down said street.

    Seriously, don’t be a chicken shit if you want to use this device! Have the balls to let everyone aroound you, including the owner of the restaurant, that you are the one turning off the tv. Don’t like seeing or listening to a tv while you eat…stay the fuck home, where you have the right to make that decision! Don’t go to someones place of business, especially a place that may rely in part on those tv’s to bring in business, and turn them off using a chicken shit device.

  60. Anonymous says:

    I wonder how Becky, and everyone else who likes using this little device would like it if someone had a similar device that blocked their wifi access at their local coffee shop they frequented. Because someone else doesn’t like being annoyed by all of the computer screens in their otherwise tranquil little coffee shop experience.

    And while we are exploring how one person imposes their will on others for their own enjoyment or social opinion, what would you say to a little something that kills your car whenever I feel like there are too many cars moving around me? I could just point my jacket at your car and turn it off. It will turn back on when you try to restart it, but I can just turn it off again. It doesn’t damage your car, so “no harm, no foul” right? Because when I go for a walk down the street, I don’t like having all of those moving cars around me! And by your logic, my right to a peaceful walk next to a STREET made for CARS, is more important than your right to drive down said street.

    Seriously, don’t be a chicken shit if you want to use this device! Have the balls to let everyone aroound you, including the owner of the restaurant, that you are the one turning off the tv. Don’t like seeing or listening to a tv while you eat…stay the fuck home, where you have the right to make that decision! Don’t go to someones place of business, especially a place that may rely in part on those tv’s to bring in business, and turn them off using a chicken shit device.

  61. Rock Stah says:

    haha Terrific! Been looking for something like this for years! I can’t stand going out to restaurants or pubs blasting non-sense, it just takes the fun out of socializing and connecting with people around you.

  62. I wonder, what is the difference between this device and the following:

    * Walking up to someone reading a book at the bar and closing the book and taking it away from that person
    * Walking into a bar/pub and taking down art work off the wall
    * Walking into a bar/pub when live music is playing and unplugging the sound system and lights
    * Walking into a place and unplugging the jukebox machine or the stereo they use for background music
    * Walking up to a group of people who are loud and taking all their beer off the table and telling them to be quiet

    I think Becky and Mitch Altman are cool, but I’m conflicted about this device. It enables the user to engage in action without having to actually talk to anyone. It’s one thing to use it to play a joke on your friends (or kids!). I remember building a white noise FM jammer in high school and using it on my friends. But I only did it for a couple minutes and then showed them what it was.

    It’s another, however, to use it in a public place like a restaurant. It’s basically playing the passive aggressive child when the adult action would be to ask staff to turn it off, turn it down, re-seat you, etc. If they refuse, get up and leave. If enough people do this, management will get the hint and act. This is much more effective than making wait staff run around trying to turn it back on while angry patrons complain. If management doesn’t, then realize that they can make money without people like you; find a place that caters to your tastes.

    The device, as some would use it, basically lets you avoid human interaction. That may be great to some; I think it’s better to treat others as human beings and give them the dignity of actually talking to them as such.

    If you’re not going to do the things listed above, then you shouldn’t use the TV-B-Gone in these places. And if you are going to do these things, then do them yourself. Don’t hide behind technology.

  63. I wonder, what is the difference between this device and the following:

    * Walking up to someone reading a book at the bar and closing the book and taking it away from that person
    * Walking into a bar/pub and taking down art work off the wall
    * Walking into a bar/pub when live music is playing and unplugging the sound system and lights
    * Walking into a place and unplugging the jukebox machine or the stereo they use for background music
    * Walking up to a group of people who are loud and taking all their beer off the table and telling them to be quiet

    I think Becky and Mitch Altman are cool, but I’m conflicted about this device. It enables the user to engage in action without having to actually talk to anyone. It’s one thing to use it to play a joke on your friends (or kids!). I remember building a white noise FM jammer in high school and using it on my friends. But I only did it for a couple minutes and then showed them what it was.

    It’s another, however, to use it in a public place like a restaurant. It’s basically playing the passive aggressive child when the adult action would be to ask staff to turn it off, turn it down, re-seat you, etc. If they refuse, get up and leave. If enough people do this, management will get the hint and act. This is much more effective than making wait staff run around trying to turn it back on while angry patrons complain. If management doesn’t, then realize that they can make money without people like you; find a place that caters to your tastes.

    The device, as some would use it, basically lets you avoid human interaction. That may be great to some; I think it’s better to treat others as human beings and give them the dignity of actually talking to them as such.

    If you’re not going to do the things listed above, then you shouldn’t use the TV-B-Gone in these places. And if you are going to do these things, then do them yourself. Don’t hide behind technology.

    1. Anonymous says:

      @twitter-39656360:disqus your examples are clearly not like the tv-b-gone. stealing books and beef are different than turning on or off a tv :) usually beef or book theft is not considered a harmless prank while the tv-b-gone for the most part is.

      1. Ok, then what about unplugging the sound system and lights when live music is playing? There’s a bar I frequent and I really don’t care for their live music days. What’s the difference between me turning off the TVs remotely and unplugging the sound system so I don’t have to listen to the music? Harmless prank? After all, they can just plug it back in. What about just taking art work off the wall and setting it down? No theft, no damage, and the staff can just hang it back up. Harmless prank?

      2. Ok, then what about unplugging the sound system and lights when live music is playing? There’s a bar I frequent and I really don’t care for their live music days. What’s the difference between me turning off the TVs remotely and unplugging the sound system so I don’t have to listen to the music? Harmless prank? After all, they can just plug it back in. What about just taking art work off the wall and setting it down? No theft, no damage, and the staff can just hang it back up. Harmless prank?

      3. Ok, then what about unplugging the sound system and lights when live music is playing? There’s a bar I frequent and I really don’t care for their live music days. What’s the difference between me turning off the TVs remotely and unplugging the sound system so I don’t have to listen to the music? Harmless prank? After all, they can just plug it back in. What about just taking art work off the wall and setting it down? No theft, no damage, and the staff can just hang it back up. Harmless prank?

    2. Anonymous says:

      @twitter-39656360:disqus your examples are clearly not like the tv-b-gone. stealing books and beef are different than turning on or off a tv :) usually beef or book theft is not considered a harmless prank while the tv-b-gone for the most part is.

  64. Anonymous says:

    I like TV’s in restaurants, but this would be a great idea for doctor’s offices who stream and blast commercials at you at 120 decibels…is there a mute button version available? Funny, we had to leave a Mexican restaurant last week because they had a Mariachi band walking from table to table that was so loud one of our kids started to cry!

  65. Anonymous says:

    I like TV’s in restaurants, but this would be a great idea for doctor’s offices who stream and blast commercials at you at 120 decibels…is there a mute button version available? Funny, we had to leave a Mexican restaurant last week because they had a Mariachi band walking from table to table that was so loud one of our kids started to cry!

  66. Anonymous says:

    I like TV’s in restaurants, but this would be a great idea for doctor’s offices who stream and blast commercials at you at 120 decibels…is there a mute button version available? Funny, we had to leave a Mexican restaurant last week because they had a Mariachi band walking from table to table that was so loud one of our kids started to cry!

  67. Anonymous says:

    I like TV’s in restaurants, but this would be a great idea for doctor’s offices who stream and blast commercials at you at 120 decibels…is there a mute button version available? Funny, we had to leave a Mexican restaurant last week because they had a Mariachi band walking from table to table that was so loud one of our kids started to cry!

  68. Anklesneeze says:

    Wow,
    The intensity of the reaction to this is fascinating. Should there be pending legislation to take all these miscreants with TV-be-gone’s and put them in labor camps?
    Perhaps we should work at finding electronic cures for all of life’s irritations, like ‘crying-baby-begone’, ‘annoying-loud-talker inverse noise cancellation generator’, or even a ‘objectionable-opinion-eradicator’.
    We should replace all of those awkward social interactions like asking for a TV to be turned off or down, with a device that imposes our will on others.
    Or we could use this as a harmless prank on friends in a situation where we know that it will cause no real harm or annoyance to others. That would be the polite and mannerly way to employ such a device.
    Can a common sense subroutine be programmed into the device so that it will never be abused? Or is it possible that humans are the unreliable link in this problem?
    “Are you pondering what I’m pondering, Pinky?” -The Brain.

  69. MacC says:

    Hmmm. Sounds like someone needs to develop a TV-B-Gone detector system. Pair up a near-IR sensitive digital camera with a computer containing software that will detect the light emitted by the TV-B-Gone. The camera would be positioned by the TV and pointed out towards the patrons’ seating. When the offending individual turns off the TV, the computer turns the TV back on, switches the input to VGA, and displays the image from the camera when the TV was turned off, with a big red X placed where the TV-B-Gone light came from.

    Then the offender can be given the bum’s rush!

    A low tech solution would be to hang a near-IR blocking mask over the location on the TV where its IR sensor is located. The establishment’s staff would simply move the mask prior to changing the settings on the TV. Perhaps a little more work, but it would foil the TV-B-Gone wielders.

    I offer solutions, not vitriol!

  70. MacC says:

    Hmmm. Sounds like someone needs to develop a TV-B-Gone detector system. Pair up a near-IR sensitive digital camera with a computer containing software that will detect the light emitted by the TV-B-Gone. The camera would be positioned by the TV and pointed out towards the patrons’ seating. When the offending individual turns off the TV, the computer turns the TV back on, switches the input to VGA, and displays the image from the camera when the TV was turned off, with a big red X placed where the TV-B-Gone light came from.

    Then the offender can be given the bum’s rush!

    A low tech solution would be to hang a near-IR blocking mask over the location on the TV where its IR sensor is located. The establishment’s staff would simply move the mask prior to changing the settings on the TV. Perhaps a little more work, but it would foil the TV-B-Gone wielders.

    I offer solutions, not vitriol!

  71. MacC says:

    Hmmm. Sounds like someone needs to develop a TV-B-Gone detector system. Pair up a near-IR sensitive digital camera with a computer containing software that will detect the light emitted by the TV-B-Gone. The camera would be positioned by the TV and pointed out towards the patrons’ seating. When the offending individual turns off the TV, the computer turns the TV back on, switches the input to VGA, and displays the image from the camera when the TV was turned off, with a big red X placed where the TV-B-Gone light came from.

    Then the offender can be given the bum’s rush!

    A low tech solution would be to hang a near-IR blocking mask over the location on the TV where its IR sensor is located. The establishment’s staff would simply move the mask prior to changing the settings on the TV. Perhaps a little more work, but it would foil the TV-B-Gone wielders.

    I offer solutions, not vitriol!

  72. I am honestly confused by the response of some of the people on here who say the tv-b-gone is fine because it is “art” and “makes people think about public spaces” and other such drivel. When asked about things that would do the same thing such as wifi or cellular blocking they always dodge the question by saying its illegal. So? If it was not illegal and someone used a radio jammer to stop radio, tv, and cell phone signals within a bar would that be ok? If it wouldn’t then why not? If it would then at what point would the line be crossed?

  73. I am honestly confused by the response of some of the people on here who say the tv-b-gone is fine because it is “art” and “makes people think about public spaces” and other such drivel. When asked about things that would do the same thing such as wifi or cellular blocking they always dodge the question by saying its illegal. So? If it was not illegal and someone used a radio jammer to stop radio, tv, and cell phone signals within a bar would that be ok? If it wouldn’t then why not? If it would then at what point would the line be crossed?

  74. I am honestly confused by the response of some of the people on here who say the tv-b-gone is fine because it is “art” and “makes people think about public spaces” and other such drivel. When asked about things that would do the same thing such as wifi or cellular blocking they always dodge the question by saying its illegal. So? If it was not illegal and someone used a radio jammer to stop radio, tv, and cell phone signals within a bar would that be ok? If it wouldn’t then why not? If it would then at what point would the line be crossed?

  75. I am honestly confused by the response of some of the people on here who say the tv-b-gone is fine because it is “art” and “makes people think about public spaces” and other such drivel. When asked about things that would do the same thing such as wifi or cellular blocking they always dodge the question by saying its illegal. So? If it was not illegal and someone used a radio jammer to stop radio, tv, and cell phone signals within a bar would that be ok? If it wouldn’t then why not? If it would then at what point would the line be crossed?

  76. I am honestly confused by the response of some of the people on here who say the tv-b-gone is fine because it is “art” and “makes people think about public spaces” and other such drivel. When asked about things that would do the same thing such as wifi or cellular blocking they always dodge the question by saying its illegal. So? If it was not illegal and someone used a radio jammer to stop radio, tv, and cell phone signals within a bar would that be ok? If it wouldn’t then why not? If it would then at what point would the line be crossed?

  77. Short version: it’s a tool for tools. There’s no good reason to make or use this beyond the fun of simply making it. The “interesting exploration of public space” idea is possibly the flat out dumbest handwaving argument I’ve seen in years, even without the somewhat crucial point that bars and restaurants are not public spaces. reminds me of people whining about their first amendment rights being violated by anyone other than the government.

    however, rather than just get angry at this admittedly indefensible douchebaggery, i think a more apt response would be to amuse yourselves with thinking of countermeasures.

    my first thought was simply setting up a business that had the dual function of selling drinks and also selling services. the service being the opportunity to turn off the place’s TV, for the reasonable charge of $1,000 (or whatever the price level that turns it from a misdemeanor into a felony) and all the clothes you’re currently wearing minus underwear and shoes.

    that turns it from a hard-to-argue civil offence to a criminal offence (theft of services). or it makes for a big bill and a really funny walk home. well. funny for everyone else in the bar. not so funny for the entitled d-bag i suppose.

    how to enforce it is a separate layer though. easiest is an IR camera mounted by the TV triggered by a remote signal. mentioned earlier.or you could simply train your staff in recognizing likely culprits. look for affected hairstyles, facial piercings, a look of entirely unwarranted hipster superiority and the faint stench of poor social graces.I think *that* is a far more interesting experiment in how people behave in shared spaces.

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