AFOL Cole Blaq built this giant version of a broken Lego brick out of other Lego bricks using a technique called SNOT — Studs Not on Top, referring to the fact that smooth plates were used to cover up the usual studs. [Via The Brothers Brick]

John Baichtal

John Baichtal

My interests include writing, electronics, RPGs, scifi, hackers & hackerspaces, 3D printing, building sets & toys. @johnbaichtal nerdage.net


  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1017426719 Matthew Jachimstal

    Very cool. Funny that this post comes one day after this: http://www.foxtrot.com/2011/06/06122011/

  • http://profiles.google.com/ironleg Ronnie Hinton

    Doesn’t look like SNOT to me unless you just mean they capped the whole thing with plate pieces. I thought SNOT reffered to joining bricks like this: http://www.holgermatthes.de/bricks/data/images/technics/snot-example-6_thumb.png

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_NGTCIVWWHCFB62VCWYL3LZ62DM Todd

      Ronnie’s correct. In the truest sense of the term S.N.O.T. this is not indicative of studs not on top construction. The backside of this construction and the way the disjointed appearance is accomplished may have used SNOT construction, but the tiles are indicative of common studs on top orientation. This link (http://news.lugnet.com/announce/?n=3429) leads you to a PDF document all about SNOT buidling.