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I couldn’t dredge up much information about this project, but this Arduino-based Facebook “Like” button by Mario Klingemann will be on display at the Ultra Social exhibition, a part of the UAMO Festival in Munich. I wish I could be there so that I can push it myself, since I definitely want to be counted among those who like this project.

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Matt Richardson

Matt Richardson

Matt Richardson is a Brooklyn-based creative technologist, Contributing Editor at MAKE, and Resident Research Fellow at New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP). He’s the co-author of Getting Started with Raspberry Pi and the author of Getting Started with BeagleBone.


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Comments

  1. Allen Smith says:

    That is very cool but I don’t think it would actually “Like” on Facebook.  How would you enter your Facebook credentials?

    1. I’m fairly certain it doesn’t actually do anything on Facebook. It’s fun, nonetheless.

      1. Pete Mills says:

        So basically

        if( digitalRead(inPin )

        {

        lcd.print( ++likes_counter );

        delay(100);

        }

        1. Tim Kemp says:

          // Might want to make it:

          if( digitalRead( inPin ))
          {
              lcd.print( ++likes_counter );
              while(digitalRead( inPin ));
          }

          // to avoid liking too much.  :-)

          1. Pete Mills says:

            Ok, since we keep getting closer and closer to a real debounce routine lets make it…

            if( digitalRead( inPin ) )
            {
                 delay( 20 );    // wait for switch contacts to settle
                
                 if( digitalRead( inPin ) )
                 {
                      lcd.print( ++likes_counter );
                      delay( 100 );     // or your while( digitalRead( inPin ) ); if you prefer
                 }
            }

          2. Pete Mills says:

            Ok, since we keep getting closer and closer to a real debounce routine lets make it…

            if( digitalRead( inPin ) )
            {
                 delay( 20 );    // wait for switch contacts to settle
                
                 if( digitalRead( inPin ) )
                 {
                      lcd.print( ++likes_counter );
                      delay( 100 );     // or your while( digitalRead( inPin ) ); if you prefer
                 }
            }

          3. Ha! Who knew this would turn into a conversation about debounce techniques? Perhaps a separate blog post is in order for this topic?

          4. Tim Kemp says:

            It would be fun to write some posts about simple programming techniques.  Sadly I have no idea how to create a blog post.

          5. Pete Mills says:

            Hey Tim,

            You should check out blogger.com or wordpress.org.  Creating a blog couldn’t be easier.  If you do create a blog, let me know and I will be sure to visit!

          6. Pete Mills says:

            Hey Tim,

            You should check out blogger.com or wordpress.org.  Creating a blog couldn’t be easier.  If you do create a blog, let me know and I will be sure to visit!

          7. Pete Mills says:

            I agree.  To me making isn’t as much about “exactly how to make a facebook button” as much as it is about empowering people by demystifying how things are made.  From a maker perspective the real interesting thing about a project is its guts; in the case of this facebook button, it’s debounce code (if any) and why the first two code posts are less desirable. 

            We should look forward to seeing this re-made into a +1 button by someone.

          8. Pete Mills says:

            Ok, since we keep getting closer and closer to a real debounce routine lets make it…

            if( digitalRead( inPin ) )
            {
                 delay( 20 );    // wait for switch contacts to settle
                
                 if( digitalRead( inPin ) )
                 {
                      lcd.print( ++likes_counter );
                      delay( 100 );     // or your while( digitalRead( inPin ) ); if you prefer
                 }
            }

    2. VRAndy says:

      If you wanted a real facebook “Like” thing, you’d probably have to do something with QR codes so everyone could hit it with their phone.   That’d ruin the tactile joy of the project, but you could still have a live LED readout.

  2. Robert Awdziej says:

    May I tap it twice? :D

  3. Robert Awdziej says:

    May I tap it twice? :D

  4. Robert Awdziej says:

    May I tap it twice? :D

  5. Robert Awdziej says:

    May I tap it twice? :D

  6. Something like this would be fun to have at Maker Faire at each of the Maker’s tables – folks could “like” what they see/learn. Fun stuff! :) 

  7. Something like this would be fun to have at Maker Faire at each of the Maker’s tables – folks could “like” what they see/learn. Fun stuff! :) 

  8. Something like this would be fun to have at Maker Faire at each of the Maker’s tables – folks could “like” what they see/learn. Fun stuff! :) 

  9. Something like this would be fun to have at Maker Faire at each of the Maker’s tables – folks could “like” what they see/learn. Fun stuff! :) 

  10. Amrit Hallan says:

    I couldn’t actually get what this is all about, simply pressing the button to like it? Or is there some more information associated with this button?

  11. Amrit Hallan says:

    I couldn’t actually get what this is all about, simply pressing the button to like it? Or is there some more information associated with this button?

  12. Anonymous says:

    I think it’s a great idea.. and decided to pick up on it about a year ago :)We’ve done something similar for cars and museums in the past:http://www.sowisocial.com/blog

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