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CRAFT sure had a great time at World Maker Faire last weekend. Here’s a highlight:

Andrew Salomone uses a hacked knitting machine from the 80s to “print” digital images into knitted garments. At World Maker Faire New York 2011, Andrew demonstrates the knitting machine and shows off its creations including a sweater with Bill Cosby’s face.

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Becky Stern

Becky Stern

Becky Stern is director of wearable electronics at Adafruit Industries. Her personal site: sternlab.org


  • http://mattrichardson.com/ Matt Richardson

    Best use of hacked knitting machine… ever. Surely someone out there seeing this video can get this sweater to Mr. Cosby, STAT.

  • Steven Critchfield

    Umm, Many computerized, therefore hackable, knitting machines of that era could accept bitmaps. My mother still uses one that I am certain she bought no later than ’90 that supports bitmaps. There is even software called Designaknit that will help convert the scanned images into knit dealing with the non-square pixels that knit becomes.

  • Steven Critchfield

    Umm, Many computerized, therefore hackable, knitting machines of that era could accept bitmaps. My mother still uses one that I am certain she bought no later than ’90 that supports bitmaps. There is even software called Designaknit that will help convert the scanned images into knit dealing with the non-square pixels that knit becomes.

  • Steven Critchfield

    Umm, Many computerized, therefore hackable, knitting machines of that era could accept bitmaps. My mother still uses one that I am certain she bought no later than ’90 that supports bitmaps. There is even software called Designaknit that will help convert the scanned images into knit dealing with the non-square pixels that knit becomes.

  • Steven Critchfield

    Umm, Many computerized, therefore hackable, knitting machines of that era could accept bitmaps. My mother still uses one that I am certain she bought no later than ’90 that supports bitmaps. There is even software called Designaknit that will help convert the scanned images into knit dealing with the non-square pixels that knit becomes.

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