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If you’ve ever wanted to make your own holograms you’ve probably realized that it’s difficult, expensive, and complicated. No so if you have this new DIY Hologram Kit from the Maker Shed, it’s easy! Just set up the included jig, use the laser to illuminate your object, and expose the self developing film. You’ll have your very own high quality hologram in less than an hour. The self developing film plates require no chemicals to develop and deliver professional results. The kit includes 20 film plates for making 20 different holograms, hologram quality diode laser with batteries, jig, darkroom lights and step-by-step instructions. Everything you need is included in the box. All you have to supply is a dark room and an object!

Features

  • Safe, Hologram-Quality Laser Diode
  • 2.0 “Instant Hologram” Film Plates (20 – 2″x3″)
  • Laser-cut Holographic Plate Holder
  • Laser-cut Laser Mount (with 2 diode mounting pieces)
  • LED Darkroom Light(For seeing in the dark without exposing the film)
  • Battery Pack and Batteries
  • Object for Hologram
  • Step-by-Step Instructions

 

Michael Castor

I am the Evangelist for the Maker Shed. It seems that there is no limit to my making interests. I’m a tinkerer at heart and have a passion for solving problems and figuring out how things work. When not working for Make I can be found falling off my unicycle, running in adverse weather conditions, skiing down the nearest hill, restoring vintage motorcycles, or working on my car.


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Comments

  1. Cool.

    “All you have to supply is a dark room”

    Is this a darkroom, or just a dark room?  

  2. Rahere says:

    A light-proof room.
    I would suggest a vibration-proofed solid base as well. I presume the reference beam splitter is in the laser mount, but can you please confirm? What about the object beam refkectors?
    Basically the plates record the interference pattern between the reference beam and the beam illuminating the image, the two being separated at an accurate 90°.
    Don’t forget you also need a projection setup for each plate, and that the depth of field is likely to be quite shallow – this quality of kit is probably limited to 10cm.
    Authority: watching Nick Phillips attempting to holograph an X-Wing fighter for Star Wars The Empire Strikes Back back in 1978 – the plan was to zap the gram down the avenue outside the London première, subsonics and all, as Her Majesty stepped from the car. It sadly didn’t work, as the 30′ depth of field proved unfixable: we’re not certain if Heisenberg, the delay in light arriving from the further points vs the frequency of light, or simply vibration affected it.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Actually, you just need a semi-dark room.  Don’t worry about light leaking under the door, or even leaving a door cracked.  Even this is just to give the best chance of success the first time.  We’ve actually made holograms in hotel lobbies and conference rooms with the lights on.

    And you definitely do not need a vibration-proofed base.  Any solid table will work – kitchen counter, dining room table, bathroom counter, etc.  Avoid setting up the hologram kit on card tables or water beds!  But the kit has been made very robust (using only a single beam setup) to help minimize vibration issues.  And once the holograms are made, you can view them immediately without any additional setup.  The holograms usually have great depth of several inches or more.  Kids who see the holograms usually try to reach around the hologram and grab the object, only to be amazed that it isn’t there.  Very impressive.

    - Paul (from Litiholo)