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By Stephanie Garlow and Ben Buckman
This twist on a hanging kitchen rack is a solution for spaces where a cabinet forms part of the wall and can’t be drilled. It gives you room to store whatever you need – pots, pans, kitchen utensils, silverware. And it adds flair by using belts to hang the bar.

Materials

Two belts
Metal bar, any length, depending on your space
Round-head brass fasteners (aka paper fasteners),
can be found at Office Max
2 small wood screws, approximately 3/4″
Sticky Tack
optional
End pieces for the bar optional
S-hooks, as many as you want and can fit on the bar

Directions

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Step 1: Fasten the end of each belt around an end of the metal bar. Line up the existing belt holes and clasp them together using a paper fastener.
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Step 2: Holding the bar in place, run the belts up vertically to the top of the cabinet. Make sure the bar is level and at the desired height, then secure the belts to the top of the cabinet with screws. The screws can either go through the belt, or to preserve the belt, can simply form a hook for the belt buckle.
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Step 3: If you are not (or cannot because the cabinet is too thin, as in our case) screwing the end pieces into the cabinet, use Sticky Tack to attach the ends of the metal bar to the back of the cabinet. Adding end pieces to the bar is optional, but it gives you separation between the bar and the cabinet so your hooks can swing freely. If you will be hanging a silverware rack, it will likely push the bar away from the wall, so use as much tack as you can fit without allowing the end pieces to bulge away from the cabinet wall.
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Step 4: Use S-hooks to hang kitchen utensils, pots and pans, aprons, and anything else from the suspended bar.
Optional Variation: If the belts are long enough and you need more hooks, loop the belts around an additional bar halfway up the back of the cabinet. Make sure the weight on the bottom bar creates enough tension to lock the middle bar in place, and use tack to reinforce.
About the Authors:
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Freelance journalist Stephanie Garlow and web developer Ben Buckman live in Buenos Aires, Argentina. You can follow their adventures on their blog, Steph and Ben’s Travels.