Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!


Because color can differ wildly from one monitor to another, many designers and publishers rely on proprietary colorimeters to calibrate their displays. Software developer and electrical engineer Richard Hughes has been working on his own open source colorimeter he calls ColorHug. Along with the Linux software (also open source), it takes about a minute for ColorHug to take several hundred measurements and create an ICC color profile, which can be read by other operating systems. Richard is now taking advanced orders on the initial production run of about 50 units. What proprietary hardware realm do you think open source hardware will disrupt next?

Matt Richardson

Matt Richardson

Matt Richardson is a Brooklyn-based creative technologist, Contributing Editor at MAKE, and Resident Research Fellow at New York University’s Interactive Telecommunications Program (ITP). He’s the co-author of Getting Started with Raspberry Pi and the author of Getting Started with BeagleBone.


Related

Comments

  1. Kyle Smeby says:

    “What proprietary hardware realm do you think open source hardware will disrupt next?”

    Open source ink jet printers!

  2. Anonymous says:

    I think they need to start making more than 50 units at a time and more user friendly software before they can claim to disrupt anything.

    I use argyll to calibrate my monitor using my datacolor spyder3 and it’s a very frustrating confusing process.  I don’t do it often enough to keep all the options in memory- and though it’s been a while since I’ve looked, simple tutorials are very rare.  Next time I get it figured out (needs to be soon) I’ll probably have to write a script.

  3. Got my ColorMunki for about $35. It opened my eyes (pun intended) to how far off monitors can often be. If this comes in cheap enough, then it could be a real game changer for amateur photographers.