Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!

Image by Andrew Kelly

The latest print edition of The Economist has an article on makers, MAKE, Maker Faire, and the burgeoning maker movement. It’s so inspiring to see a head/subhead like this in any mainstream magazine, let alone one with such business world gravitas:

More than just digital quilting — Technology and society: The “maker” movement could change how science is taught and boost innovation. It may even herald a new industrial revolution.

The article, which has no byline on the online version, is very clear and lucidly written, a great introduction to maker culture and concerns for a wider audience.

The maker movement is both a response to and an outgrowth of digital culture, made possible by the convergence of several trends. New tools and electronic components let people integrate the physical and digital worlds simply and cheaply. Online services and design software make it easy to develop and share digital blueprints. And many people who spend all day manipulating bits on computer screens are rediscovering the pleasure of making physical objects and interacting with other enthusiasts in person, rather than online. Currently the preserve of hobbyists, the maker movement’s impact may be felt much farther afield.

More Than Just Digital Quilting

More:

Gareth Branwyn

Gareth Branwyn is a freelancer writer and the former Editorial Director of Maker Media. He is the author or editor of a dozen books on technology, DIY, and geek culture, including the first book about the web (Mosaic Quick Tour) and the Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Building Robots. He is currently working on a best-of collection of his writing, called Borg Like Me.


Related
blog comments powered by Disqus

Featured Products from the MakerShed

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 25,454 other followers