Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!

 57559292 Vending2

BBC news – Intel and Kraft’s iSample vending kiosks study shoppers.

A “smart” vending machine that analyses users’ age and gender has been launched in the US by Intel and Kraft Foods. The iSample is being used to offer customers trials of a new dessert.

It allows Kraft to tailor the product to the shopper, and exclude children from the adult-focused promotion. Intel says it intends to retrofit the technology to existing vending machines to allow companies to study what type of people are buying their products. The machine uses an optical sensor fitted to the top of the machine to recognise the shape of the human face. A computer processor then carries out a series of calculations based on measurements such as the distance between the eyes, nose and ears. These are used to determine the sex of the shopper and place them in one of four age brackets. This data is then used to determine what, if any, product the shopper should be served. “It’s actually very quick – it’s a fraction of a second,” Michelle Tinsley, Intel’s general manager of personal solutions told the BBC.

Phillip Torrone

Editor at large – Make magazine. Creative director – Adafruit Industries, contributing editor – Popular Science. Previously: Founded – Hack-a-Day, how-to editor – Engadget, Director of product development – Fallon Worldwide, Technology Director – Braincraft.


Related

Comments

  1. Eric Andresen says:

    I saw one of these at the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago last week.  It looked cool, but it didn’t work.  It was evidently supposed to check if the user was an adult to give them a free sample of the “adult” jello, but it said every single person in line was a kid and the attendant had to override and reboot it for every user.  Bummer, because I wanted that jello but I didn’t want to wait in that long of a line for it.

    1. Dagny Scott says:

      Did it also arrest you for a murder you were going to commit in the future?

  2. This was recently discussed elsewhere, and apparently Japan has vending machines that work in a similar manner.  One comment suggested that the “detection” could be thwarted by simply holding up a photo of an adult’s face (presenting the right measurement ratios).

  3. This was recently discussed elsewhere, and apparently Japan has vending machines that work in a similar manner.  One comment suggested that the “detection” could be thwarted by simply holding up a photo of an adult’s face (presenting the right measurement ratios).