Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!


Jaanus Kalde has made the Tinydino, an Arduino clone that’s just 7.4 mm square. He used the ATmega88 chip and built the rest of the components around it. According to Jaanus, its features are:

-Auto reset
-UART
-SPI
-4 analog channels
-1 digital i/o
-one LED
-funny readme with BOM

It needs arduino bootloader for atmega88 like ottantotto bootloader, probably it needs some hacking too because the resonator is 8MHz not the Arduino regular 16MHz.

[via Electronics Lab]

Michael Colombo

In addition to being an online editor for MAKE Magazine, Michael Colombo works in fabrication, electronics, sound design, music production and performance (Yes. All that.) In the past he has also been a childrens’ educator and entertainer, and holds a Masters degree from NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program.


Related

Comments

  1. Colecoman1982 says:

    Is it really fair to call it the world’s smallest Arduino clone if it doesn’t really support Arduino code without significant modification (8mhz vs. 16mhz., many missing I/O pins, etc.)? As far as I know, the Femtoduino is still the smallest true Arduino clone out there with a full speed chip and the same I/O count as an Uno. If we’re letting this claim to be a true Arduino clone, I could just beat it by making a board with nothing but a Atmega chip with the boot-loader on-board and two terminals for connecting it to power (no I/O at all, no dedicated clock chip, no LED, etc.). Of course, it’d be completely useless…

  2. Juan says:

    Dead-bugging a qfn like they use to would yield an even smaller “smallest arduino.” But that got me thinking what kind of interference or other problems (aside from the pain to solder such small pads) would one likely run into when soldering directly to a qfn package? Any way to mitigate them aside from using a pcb?

  3. This is a really tiny board, Nice job! @Colecoman1982 …I’m certain there are practical applications where even the incredibly microscopic Femtoduino would still be too much firepower for certain projects. Some people may only need 1 pin instead of all the pins.

  4. [...] Tinydino: World’s Smallest Arduino Clone? (makezine.com) [...]