MAKE is a quarterly magazine for do-it-yourself enthusiasts of all kinds. Every issue is packed with how-to articles ranging from kid-friendly crafts to cutting-edge robotics. We’ve covered microcontrollers, cigar box guitars, Roomba hacks, rocket-launched video cameras, potato cannons, stop-motion movies, wind-powered generators, laser light shows, wooden puzzle boxes, remote control vehicles, home automation, and much more.

If you’re new to MAKE, our website, makezine.com, will give you an idea of the other kinds of projects we offer. You can even share your own DIY projects at our online library, makeprojects.com.

Recently, we surveyed our readers to find out what else they wanted to see in MAKE. In addition to more projects that teach basic skills such as electronics, woodworking, and alternative energy, over 90% told us tools and workshop skills were high on their wish list. That makes sense: no matter what you make, you need a dedicated space and the tools to make it.

The survey confirmed many of our beliefs about our readers, but there were surprises sprinkled in. Almost everyone we surveyed told us they already own a soldering iron, a cordless drill, and a high-speed rotary tool. And while fewer than 5% have a computer-controlled milling machine or a 3D printer, most readers wish they had these high-tech fabrication tools in their shops (count me among them).

We asked readers what they made in their workshops. We were surprised to see that 68% said they made a rocket and 47% made a robot, but only 11% made a go-kart and 7% made a kegerator (hopefully not at the same time).

The survey was of great value to us in planning this special issue of MAKE, devoted entirely to workshops and tools. Our goal is to give you everything you need to know to design, build, and stock a workshop that works for you.

We’ll show you how to construct workbenches and workhorses, describe what kinds of tools you need to accomplish almost any task you can think of, and introduce you to the exciting world of home 3D fabrication. We’ll also take you on a tour through some of our favorite makers’ workshops, including an exclusive visit to MythBuster Adam Savage’s brand new workshop/museum, which he completed just days before this issue went to press.

We hope you find this issue useful and inspiring. We also hope you’ll tell us about your own workshop (even if it exists only in your mind at this time) and what you’ve made (or want to make) by taking our latest reader survey at makezine.com/go/survey. (And if you’re one of the first 10 to respond, we’ll send you a Maker’s Notebook so you can make plans for your upcoming projects.)

Happy making!