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Participants in Derek “Deek” Diedricksen’s Tiny House Summer Camp in early July ranged in age from 13 to 62. A teenage woodworker and his dad came all the way from Oakland, California. There were three Vermonters in attendance who planned to build tiny houses and put them on trailers. When the long weekend was over, two new structures were nearly complete, which means there will likely be more space for aspiring builders to sleep in next summer if Diedricksen decides to do another Tiny House Summer Camp. Deek has another weekend workshop coming up in November at his home in Stoughton, MA. Check his site for details.

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See all of the Tiny Yellow House posts on MAKE

Jon Kalish

Jon Kalish is a Manhattan-based radio reporter, podcast producer and newspaper writer. He’s reported for NPR for more than 30 years.


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  1. When I was young in the 1950,s there were yet all over New England tiny summer houses. They were the remains of a 19th century summer residency economy. These were not sheds and used only seasonally or when I viewed them not at all. They were little houses in reality to acommodate a single person, or two,they had front doors with porch overhangs, tiny halls with little curved staircases to a single upstairs bedroom with windows and closet. Downstairs a little under stair closet, a single large room some with extended bay window, tiny fireplace and mantle in the living room and shelves pantry kitchen area no larger than a half size hostess kitchen. The detail and scale and materials a delight to those appreciating fine craftmanship. Sometimes they were built by the owners of the property as an escape or sometimes contracted to create income. Even tiny craftsman stain glass edged landing windows with tiny vase shelf on the stair landings. There were a lot of single men and women in the 19th century who really appreciated gettng away to these tiny houses to read and write and think and walk in the country air. There were and remain a few examples as well as slightly larger models to house couples or small families or guests and sometimes used as servants quarters. All had tiny outhouses very comfortably made. Add the antique furnishings all hand crafted, trimmings, carved corbels, scale shutters pale stain in vibrant shades you can imagine the magical effect on children finding this abandoned and forgotten world in our many country towns overgrown by maturing forests and forgotten flower gardens. All in sizes as small or smaller than you are creating now using each style of architecture from Craftsman, colonial, or Victorian. Good luck it is good to see the America i,ve known as vital and gifted as ever ready to meet 2 new centuries for the longest lived. Your surviving works a century from now will be a wonder and pleasure to view. Anton McInerney

  2. Susan McQuillan says:

    I love this idea and the slide show is great. Shared on my fb page! SMc