Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!

It’s hard to find a good, reliable GPS module for microcontroller use, which is why haven’t carried one. Most are complicated to use, power hungry, and require a completely clear view of the sky to get a decent fix. But when when we tested the Adafruit Ultimate GPS, we knew it was worthy enough to be in the Maker Shed. Not only is this module easy to use, it comes fully loaded. The Ultimate GPS breakout is based on the MTK3339 chipset which can track up to 22 satellites on 66 channels, has a high-sensitivity receiver, and a built in -165 db antenna. It’s capable of 10hz updates, has a position accuracy of 1.8 meters, a velocity accuracy of .1 meters per second, and it only draws 20ma of current. It’s also been successfully tested at over 88,000 feet! There’s even options to use a battery to power the RTC for “warm” starts and an output for adding an external LED to indicate a fix.

By far the most interesting feature of the Ultimate GPS Breakout though is its built in data logger. The module includes an on-board microcontroller and enough FLASH memory to log the time, date, longitude, latitude, and height every 15 seconds for up to 16 hours. All you need to do is send it a simple “start logging” command using an Arduino and it will begin! For more information, check it out in the Maker Shed.

Maker Shed

The Maker Shed is brought to you by Maker Media, the makers of MAKE Magazine, the Maker Faire, and much more.

Launched originally as a source for back issues of MAKE Magazine, the Maker Shed expanded rapidly to meet the demand for ‘projects in a box,’ otherwise known as kits. Now we have a little bit of everything for makers, crafters, and budding scientists, from Arduinos to sock monkeys to chemistry sets .


Related

Comments

  1. tururu says:

    Does it have a speed limit?

  2. geotek says:

    It looks like the one sold on Maker Shed does not have the PPS function. Which version will actually be sold?

  3. Alan S. Blue says:

    Can this model of GPS be used as an absolute time device?

    That is, there are clocks that listen to a NIST time standard broadcast from Colorado (IIRC) and keeps the clock set accurately. But the chips are irritating and require a special antenna, etc.

    Can -this- chip be used in the same fashion to drive an ‘always accurate’ clock? I think GPS requires figuring out an accurate time, but does -this- chip expose that calculated time to external widgets?

  4. Bosstiger says:

    Reblogged this on Gigable – Tech Blog.

  5. Jasper says:

    Is it possible to get the data of the satellites it’s connected to? Like their azimuth and altitude?