Find all your DIY electronics in the MakerShed. 3D Printing, Kits, Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Books & more!

A speed square is an invaluable tool in any woodworker’s toolbox, whether you’re a novice or an expert. Use it to mark cuts for angles from zero to ninety degrees.

Woodworking is a skill in which the phrase “the right tool for the job” is particularly applicable. In my time as a woodworker I’ve come across interesting tools that have struck my fancy. Some of the tools chosen for this guide are for practicality, and some are esoteric gems that are handy in the right situations.

Start the Slideshow

Michael Colombo

In addition to being an online editor for MAKE Magazine, Michael Colombo works in fabrication, electronics, sound design, music production and performance (Yes. All that.) In the past he has also been a childrens’ educator and entertainer, and holds a Masters degree from NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program.


Related

Comments

  1. ka1axy says:

    I bought a speed square years ago on a whim. I think it cost around $15. I have found it an extremely handy tool, whenever I need a straight cut with a circular saw, it’s easy to do angled cuts as well. Well worth the money.

  2. jamesbx says:

    I’m partial to combination squares for woodworking. The ability to lock, and repeat a measurement is great, as is the ability to hold a marking device on the end and scribe a layout line down a length of wood or metal. Plus I like the spirit level. For angles other than multiples of 90 and 45, I use a bevel and protractor, but that tends to be rare.

  3. David says:

    6″ Bionic Wrench, Loggerhead Tools.
    MAKE wrote: “… There has been recent controversy over Sears ceasing to carry the tool and creating their own China-made version that is very similar to Brown’s. However the case shakes out, this is a novel tool that deserves recognition for its utility and originality.”

    Sears has been doing this for well over half a century. It got so notorious that they long ago let themselves be sued to show they had mended their ways. It now appears to be the same-old-same-old. Policy like this is why I refuse to shop at Sears … or WalMart. My grandfather hated Sears.

    Story at:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/09/business/popular-wrench-fights-a-chinese-rival.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&ref=todayspaper

    1. What’s going on with Loggerhead and Sears is unfortunate. To Sears’ credit though, they have a lifetime guarantee on all Craftsman hand tools. You can return one all bent up and rusted out and they’ll replace it for you, no questions asked. I thought it was worth mentioning since not everyone knows about it.

      1. ka1axy says:

        I’m still happier that you listed the Loggerhead version instead of the Chinese copy.

  4. David says:

    Sears can well-afford their replacement policy because they take an American designed and made tool and make it in China. Co-opting innovation and destroying local jobs is very profitable.