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Ping Fu is the founder of 3D software pioneer Geomagic and a true believer in the transformative power of 3D technology. 3D Systems announced plans to acquire Geomagic earlier this month, and now Fu serves as the conglomerate’s chief strategy officer as well. Also this month, Fu published Bend, Not Break: A Life in Two Worlds, a powerful, deeply personal memoir that chronicles her life in China as a victim of Mao’s Cultural Revolution, a U.S. immigrant, and later, a successful entrepreneur, visionary, and technology advisor to President Obama. It’s an inspiring, moving book about personal resilience, the value of vulnerability, and the power of making. It deserves a wide audience.

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Choose virtually any chapter of Fu’s life and it reads like an epic. Taken from her family by Mao’s Red Guards when she was just 8 years old, she was forced to live in squalor in a reeducation camp, where she had to care for her 4-year-old sister far from her comfortable life in Shanghai. For 10 years she endured hunger, physical abuse, public humiliation, loneliness, and a brutal sexual assault at the age of 10. But as the tyranny of Mao’s Cultural Revolution eased, she began to work in factories, where she learned electronics at a young age. Later, she was allowed to apply to university and was just one of a fraction of applicants accepted in a country that had banned academics for a decade. She went on to become the editor of a literary magazine, but was branded a counter-revolutionary because of an article published in the journal deemed critical of the Communist Party. Already blacklisted, two years later she wrote her senior thesis on China’s “one family, one child” rule and the female infanticide that resulted. Her thesis fell into the hands of the press and the story of infant deaths became an international outrage that exposed China’s human rights violations.

Ping-Fu-exec

For that, she was whisked away to a stinking cell with bound wrists and a black bag over her head. She was released, but later told by officials that she had to leave China. She was exiled.

Leaving her family, she flew to the United States and arrived in Albuquerque, N.M. with just $80 and three words of English: “hello,” “thank you,” and “help.” From that point, she put herself through school as a maid and waitress, entered the then-new field of computer programming, and climbed to the top of the industry. Among other things, she worked on the team that created NCSA Mosaic, later known as Netscape. Ultimately, she founded her own company and rescued it from the brink of bankruptcy.

Whew. That’s quite a life, and as Bend, Not Break makes clear, Fu is quite a woman. Written with unflinching candor about her personal life, China, and corporate America, Fu’s strength seems to come from the words of Taoist wisdom her father imparted to her in the happy days in Shanghai before Mao. The advice is where the book gets its title: Bend, not break. It’s also clear that she’s a keenly intelligent, adaptable, and humble woman. The book reads as a series of episodes in which Fu tackles one challenge after the other. In spite of what are always long odds, she prevails again and again, even taking setbacks like her husband’s abandonment, low employee moral, lawsuits, and other body blows as opportunities to learn and grow. This perspective adds up to passages like this:

Life has been messy for me, as it has for most people. I have come to the realization that challenging experiences break us all at some point — our bodies and  minds, our hearts and egos. When we put ourselves back together, we find that we are no longer perfectly straight, but rather bent and cracked. Yet it is through these cracks that our authenticity shines. It is by revealing these cracks that we can learn to see and be seen deeply.

In China, she told me, making and craftsmanship are highly revered, and under Mao, factory jobs were prized. Her experience working in Mao’s factories planted a seed in her mind that sprouted when she sought to create her own company. Rather than launch another internet-based business as was the rage at the time, she wanted to connect software to the physical world. That was her vision for Geomagic and 3D technology.

“I was a maker all along,” she says.

She believes that 3D printers are a revolutionary technology that’s even greater than the personal computer because at its essence, it is about making things.

“We all grew up making things. That to me is more natural [than using a PC].”

3D Systems’ moves to acquire Geomagic were too recent to make it into the book. But in characteristic candor, she says she was reluctant to sell the company, but investors wanted a payout and she felt the timing was right to merge Geomagic’s software with 3D Systems’ reach to finally realize her goal of “democratizing” manufacturing through on-demand, mass customization, and locally based production that can “unleash” individual makers and small and medium-sized manufacturers while large-scale manufacturing fades away. She writes:

It is possible to interrupt the cycle of painful and often shortsighted outsourcing that many people still accept as the the inevitable outcome of globalization. Instead, we will move increasingly toward a modern version of localization, with local production marked by a global interconnectedness and accessibility.

“I finally feel that is becoming real,” she says.

Stett Holbrook

Stett is a senior editor at MAKE with abiding interest in food and drink, bicycles, woodworking, and environmentally sound human enterprises. He is the father of two young makers.

He is also the co-creator of Food Forward, a documentary TV series for PBS about the innovators and pioneers changing our food system.

Contact Stett with tips and story ideas on:

*Food
*Sustainable/green design
*Science
*Young Makers
*Action sports


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Comments

  1. Karl says:

    I just went to amazon.com and wanted to buy this book. I found something funny. There’re only 2 kinds of reviews for this book: 1-star and 5-star. Most of 1-star reviewers said they’re Chinese and used words like “liar”, “lying” or “fake” in their reviews. Most likely, the government sent them to make the bad reviews. Horrible. The more 1-stars this book get, the more you should believe what the author said in the book.

    1. Teng says:

      Sorry but her experience in china is indeed exaggerated…good for you if you can learn something from a fake story.

      1. Andy says:

        Nothing in the story is exaggerated and the author is brave to share her story. It’s no surprise it’s uncomfortable for some.

        1. Chuck says:

          This Andy person is blind.

          1. media watch says:

            It’s very interesting to observe that if someone has different opinion against what some Americans choose to believe, they are labeled as “send by Chinese government”. Let me tell you something about myself: I moved to North America in the early 90s, graduated from college here and have a decent job in a university. I have no connection to Chinese government. Except I lived in China during the cultural revolution. What do you know about China other than what you assumed that is a terrible country under a terrible government?

    2. Ming says:

      I really need to check my bank count to see if the payment from Chinese gov has arrived…lol

      Chinese government paid a lot of money to control the internet in China. But, come on, the comments on amazon? You people do think too high on yourself…..

    3. clouds says:

      The reason whysundenly there are so many 1 star comments is simply that her story was posted in chinese twitter (t.sina.com.cn). People found that there are lots of fake experience in her book and interview. Such as she was exile to US for telling some truth. Actually, Chinese government at that time would throw those discents in prison. Exiling to US is only for those big names and only happened after 1990s with lots of pressure from western countries.

      She said she only know 4 English words when she was in US with student VISA. But as anyone have Chinese bachelor’s degree, it is impossible. We all need to learn English in the college.

      One photo she provided to the media shows taht she is one of the red guard army soldiers herself.

    4. JW says:

      I am sure you will enjoy your read. I get renewed energy and a brighter outlook of life every time I read Lance Armstrong’s book. After all, he is a great athlete, he fought cancer and he started charity. SO he is a victim!

    5. Sue says:

      If you believe what she said, I have to say that you just believe a lair. In the Chinese website, the most of Chinese people know what she said in her book, they are angry what she said because the author did not tell the truth. I know that the Americans really don’t like a person who does not have credit, this author is a person who did not tell the truth about her experience.

  2. Andy says:

    Not fake. The Forbes story had some inaccuracies, which I suspect will soon be corrected. The media exaggerates, not the author. The story is phenomenal, as is the person. 100% true.

    1. Her book reads “My mother and I went to the school and declared I had a mental breakdown so I would not be sent to remote China (page 258).” So, she DID LIED 30 years ago and took advantage of it according to Ping Fu herself. This can be used to back your acclaim that the book is 100% true.

  3. Ming says:

    Unfortunately, Most of her experience in China is fake. In this days, a lot of discussions are ongoing in Chinese network about this book. The only purpose of this story is to helping her got a US visa in that good old days…

  4. Da Wang says:

    The lies in this book are beyond my imagination. I entered into an university in China in 1978 (half year later after the author entered into her college in 1977) and graduated in 1982. I knew back in 1980′s, going to America was a dream of almost every Chinese. Everyone would have had conducted such a crime if the penalty was to be deported to America. At least I would have done that. If 10% of her stories were true, she should have been well-known. Actually, she is nobody until now, after her book.

  5. schigleymsichke says:

    The Chinese are very proud of their country. They also don’t know everything about their own history. They will, no doubt, not believe the Western version of their recent history. Their government doesn’t have to put them up to giving negative reviews of something like this. They’ll do it themselves, proudly.

  6. Leo R says:

    Unfortunately many Chinese immigrants tell lies in order to get their green cards. I’m just thinking that Ping Fu might be one of them who fabricated her story in China so that she could get the permanent residency in US. Her wikipedia page about her childhood seems more believable and doesn’t have that many “dramatized” episodes as in her book, although the part of her being exiled to US is really hard to imagine. One-child policy is one of the easiest ways and hence one of the most popular excuses used in the green card cases for Chinese immigrants. None of them were exiled by the Chinese government. They came to US either on a student visa or a visitor visa, and then found a lawyer to do the job for them. It is probably easy to get the Shanghai newspaper or the China Daily as Ping claimed to prove her part of story, but I double that will ever happen.

  7. Tou Ji says:

    Apparently this reviewer knows nothing about China, too lazy to do even minimal fact checking, and is naive beyond help.
    Just go to http://www.fastcompany.com/3004166/bend-not-break-leadership-lessons-resilience-amid-struggle and take a look at the second photo. For anyone who does not read Chinese, the characters on the flag says, “Platoon of Red Guards” and all the kids, including her, were wearing the Red Guards arm band. The fact that she went to college right after Culture Revolution, and came to the US after graduation, can only mean that her family was well connected in China. I don’t know how naive a person has to be to believe that a college graduate, after taking 4 years of English lessons in college (which is required), would come to the US knowing only three English words, and those words did not include “yes”, “no”, “one”, “two”, “three”.

  8. Lan says:

    The negative reviews on Amazon provided detailed and reasonable doubt with many facts in the book. Some western readers (J.Taylor) who actually lived in China at the time also agreed that this book contains “too many incongruities and anomalies to make the book entirely believable”. I don’t think he was paid and sent by Chinese government. If you want to read a truly remarkable book based on real personal experience of Cultural Revolution of China, read “Life and death in Shanghai”. The book is banned in China, but you won’t find many one star reviews on Amazon, and definitely no accusations of liar.

  9. Calling someone a liar violates MAKE’s code of conduct. Personal attacks don’t promote discussion. Please stick to the facts. Do critics of Ping Fu’s book have evidence to back up their claims?

    1. Leo R says:

      I’d be interested to see what MAKE will do if her story is indeed a lie. Honestly it is Ms Fu herself chose to publish her story so it is up to her to provide the evidence to back up her side of story. I’m sure you will have a very good story to write about once you follow up with Ms Fu on all the questions and doubts out there. Actually Forbes has jumped the gun already by doing that.
      http://www.forbes.com/sites/jennagoudreau/2013/01/31/bend-not-break-author-ping-fu-responds-to-backlash/

      1. Due to the volume of comments about the veracity of Ping Fu’s story I have asked her to respond here as well as to allow me to interview her again so I can ask her about some of the questions raised.

        1. Lan says:

          Ping Fu issued a statement. She labelled all negative reviews as personal attack or smear campaign while still avoiding answering any of the questions directly.

          1. Please post the link if available.

          2. Tou Ji says:

            Here is the link to Ms Fu’s clarification, http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ping-fu/clarifying-the-facts-in-bend-not-break_b_2603405.html. Stett, now that you are ready to ask some tough questions, I doubt she will accept your invitation. But you can try.

        2. JW says:

          Fat chance she will do another interview with you.

    2. manoe says:

      Here is the detailed analysis and some responses from other reviewers and Ping Fu herself. Please be noted that Ping Fu avoided to address any of the reviewer’s question directly, instead, she requested “private communication”. Does it look normal to you?

      http://www.amazon.com/review/R22LIB1HMUDXPB/ref=cm_cr_dp_title?ie=UTF8&ASIN=1591845521&nodeID=283155&store=books

    3. She told us she was a liar 30 years ago. Her book reads “My mother and I went to the school and declared I had a mental breakdown so I would not be sent to remote China (page 258).”

  10. Vic says:

    What she described is more like about a daughter of a Nazi family finishing her undergraduate education during the holocaust, and then going to USA for further education and better life, but now declaring that she has suffered all that happened in the Auschwitz. The main difference here is that the “Nazi” government in China is now still governing the country but with less and less authority, under which people can talk quite freely now via internet. If this is what American Dream is really about, then the bigger a lie is, the bigger “success” is in America. Proud, eh?

    1. Charles cai says:

      Great point.

  11. lang Lang says:

    Why we are suckers for lies?
    A psychological explanation.

    1, Association/reprehensive/stereo type tendency
    Association is one of the most powerful psychological tendencies hardwired into human brains by genes. It is developed by brain to handle vast amount of information. Simply speaking it’s a shortcut to reduce information processing because our brains cannot process that much information we encounter every day. In our case, most of Americans have been conditioned by the media so that they think because communism/dictatorship=devil, China=communism/dictatorship so China=devil. So when they heard a bad story about Chinese government, they won’t bother to check how much truth the story holds because it’s must be true—it’s coming from China “the Devil”.

    2, Availability-misweighing
    We know that people tend to believe things that are more familiar to them, or can be better retrieved from their brain memory or more available to them. So obviously the China pictured by the media is more familiar to most Americans and therefore they tend to believe the book because it matches the China the media has pictured for them. And they never bother to collect more and unfamiliar facts about China or in that matter all unfamiliar foreign countries.

    3, Avoid doubts tendency
    Believe it or not, our brains don’t like uncertainty. If given the chance, our brains will try to avoid doubts. If you heard the same kind of story but say it happened in Canada. You would doubt the truth of this story. But it happened in China, and you don’t know much about China except from the media. And if China is already associated with devil, than your brains would take the chance to avoid doubts and believe the story.

    4, Over optimism/wishful thinking tendency
    We all know this saying “what a man wishes, that also will he believe”. We all want to believe great stories (or wish great story to be true, just like we wish we could win lottery). Ping’s story is a great one: not only had she survived one of the most brutal systems but also prospered after she came to America, fulfilled her American dream. Of course everybody wants to believe it. Who doesn’t?

    5, Authority
    Ping’s book got great reviews from some famous critics, so it must be true. She was also interviewed by the media, so it must be a true story. Is it really?

    6, Social proof
    We all know “monkey see monkey do”. Everybody likes Ping’s book, it must be good and true. Especially those Authorities like it. Authority compounding with Social proof sometimes could be very powerful.

    Even after we know that the story is a lie, there is still people defending and justfying it. Why? See below:

    7, Incentive-caused bias
    Their logic goes like this: China is devil anyway, so what’s wrong with fighting against it; we should use all tools we have, even lies. Maybe some people can understand this logic but it has nothing to do with truth and don’t forget somebody is making a fortune out of a lie. Fighting devil and making money at the same time, what a great story. Is it about money or devil?

    8, Self-serving
    I am better than you guys so my opinions are better than you guys so I can’t be wrong so you are wrong.

    9, Denial
    It looks very stupid if one found his/her previous statements are wrong especially when publicly stated. It’s painful to admit that you are wrong so the alternative is to keep your head in the sand.

    10, Commitment and consistency
    I have made a public statement about the book, so I have to be consistent with my opinion. I will ignore all unfavorable evidence and find all favorable evidence to support my opinion/theory.

    So in summary, all these psychological tendencies work together in the same direction to mislead educated Americans to believe a lie. Two star for a great lie.

  12. my2cents says:

    Her childhood friend, her college classmate, and many Chinese who lived through her years have provided tons of facts to prove her books and interviews are full of lies. What other facts do you want to see?
    It’s amazing that no matter how obvious a lie is, you can always find people to buy it. She is really smart to take advantage of this. And she is powerful because she made NPR, Forbes, Wall Street Journal, etc all like fools to Chinese people. Chines government should thank her for this!

  13. Leon says:

    what’s amazing is (1) how weird people get when others do well, and (2) how weird people get when others have fame. the people claiming to be “childhood friend”, “college classmate”, etc. do not know her. their stories are the ones that are fabricated. how sad a thoughtful, brave memoir breeds cynnicism.

    1. manoe says:

      Please read the Amazon review by Lin. It provides detailed analysis why Ping Fu’s stories can’t be true. The analysis are based on facts, not personal accounts. People also checked the newspaper that Ping Fu claimed published her college thesis about the brutality of one-child policy. There is no such paper in the achive. Ping Fu so far has avoided to provide any direct reference of the paper, or the proof of the existence of the paper. This is the fact that you chose to ignore. Please define what you would call facts.

      1. Bullying and gossip are not constructive. says:

        lin’s assertions are unfounded, as is your assertion that ping claimed her thesis was published. ping’s perspective is in 2 pieces on huffington post, if you choose to be informed you can see her public response there. or better yet: if you haven’t read the book, read it. comments by those who have not read it are simply gossip, which serves no one.

        1. Lan says:

          I read the book. All I can say is that it can only be categorized as fiction, not non-fiction. Ping Fu retracted some of her previous stories, but how you would explain the numerous inconsistencies betweeen her narratives during her radio and TV interviews? You just igore them? This is not constructive either. BTW, Stett, are you able to have an interview with Ms Fu? What is your opinion, based on your own analysis of the evidence presented from both sides so far?

  14. Geoff says:

    Let’s assume an American went to China and told people that after Democratic party came to power, he and his comrades were brutally beatened and even slaughtered simply because they are Republicans…Well, if he went 40 years ago, some Chinese might say “wow, that’s horrible” and believe what he said based on their bitter memory of the Chinese civil war and the propagandar that USA is evil…

    As another American come to China, when you heard this, how would you describe this person? A liar? Well, people might ask you to backup your claim with evidence. And how would you prove you’re doing this not because you’re jealous of him getting Chinese’s people’s attention? Hard, isn’t it?

    I have to admit that Ping Fu is a very smart lady. She knows this better than any one of us.

    To my fellow Chinese friends, calm down. Ping is no doubt successful. And the mainstream just loves what she told them… Pick a copy of her book and read. I just found the way she described her China experience is nothing but amusing.

    1. Charles cai says:

      Ye, if idiots want to be fooled, let them enjoy being fooled. What are we doing here. Ping fu is a Chinese. Let her go ahead to fool all those idiots as far as they feel great of being fooled.

  15. Larry Trump says:

    One of Ms. Fu’s honor is from the immigration (USCIS), but her real trouble might have started from there, too: at the moment she applied for permanent residency.

    As a foreign student then, she had to find good reason for the green card.
    That’s how all this mess began, most likely.

    1. Carl Hsu says:

      Dr. Fang (A influential Chinese blogger) suspects that she got her green card as Political Asylum. She denied that she applied PR based on political asylum in her responses. However, there is a mainstream Chinese Newspaper in US reported that she got her green card as political asylum when she was awarded “Outstanding American By Choice” in 2012 (in Chinese).

  16. Nancy Chen says:

    Ping Fu said: “Chinese international students had many ways of being able to stay in the United States. One of those was to fabricate bizarre tales of having faced persecution in China and apply for political asylum. It didn’t matter how fantastic you made your experiences, Americans would still believe them to be true.” From some of the American comments above, I think Ping Fu knows whatever bizarre tales she spins, her book will be believed by westerners. Could she dare to give an interview to Chinese people and tell her explanations of all those lies she made up in the book?

  17. Commentor says:

    Reading comments is fun. Here I listed some non Chinese comments( I assume) and add my own for them to comment as well.

    Karl on January 29th, 2013 at 3:45 pm said:
    I just went to amazon.com and wanted to buy this book. I found something funny. There’re only 2 kinds of reviews for this book: 1-star and 5-star. Most of 1-star reviewers said they’re Chinese and used words like “liar”, “lying” or “fake” in their reviews. Most likely, the government sent them to make the bad reviews. Horrible. The more 1-stars this book get, the more you should believe what the author said in the book.

    My comment: you just guess about those 1-star reviewers, right? based on your guess, you reached your conclusion and not facts, not your personal experience such as lived in China during the period of time and interviewed those who know the author: “you should believe what the author said in the book”. Isn’t funny ? LOL

    Andy on January 30th, 2013 at 12:06 am said:
    Not fake. The Forbes story had some inaccuracies, which I suspect will soon be corrected. The media exaggerates, not the author. The story is phenomenal, as is the person. 100% true.

    My comment: well, how do you know the author not exaggeates and its 100% true? Based on what facts ?

    schigleymsichke on January 30th, 2013 at 2:06 pm said:
    The Chinese are very proud of their country. They also don’t know everything about their own history. They will, no doubt, not believe the Western version of their recent history. Their government doesn’t have to put them up to giving negative reviews of something like this. They’ll do it themselves, proudly.

    My comments: yes and of course, not just Chinese, people around the world love their own country, anything wrong with love their own country where they were born, grow, their parents, brothers, sisters and ancester live and lived? :) How do you judge “They also don’t know everything about their own history.” if I am not mistaken, you are non-Chinese, do you think you know Chinese history better than those who from China?

    Leon on January 31st, 2013 at 10:09 pm said:
    what’s amazing is (1) how weird people get when others do well, and (2) how weird people get when others have fame. the people claiming to be “childhood friend”, “college classmate”, etc. do not know her. their stories are the ones that are fabricated. how sad a thoughtful, brave memoir breeds cynnicism.

    My comment: you sounds like Chinese, another guess, or maybe you are the person therefore think others will do the same, correct? Also, since you said “the people claiming to be “childhood friend”, “college classmate”, etc. do not know her” sounds like you already know something that others may not know, so can you please give us a little more such as who are these people (“childhood friend”, “college classmate”,)and how do you know these “childhood friend”, “college classmate”, etc. do not know her” ? the author told you? share with us these FACTS, will you ?? :)

    Bullying and gossip are not constructive.
    on February 4th, 2013 at 12:05 pm said:
    lin’s assertions are unfounded, as is your assertion that ping claimed her thesis was published. ping’s perspective is in 2 pieces on huffington post, if you choose to be informed you can see her public response there. or better yet: if you haven’t read the book, read it. comments by those who have not read it are simply gossip, which serves no one.

    My comment: I suggest you read latest Lin’s comment as the author want talk to Lin in “Private”, what does that mean, you tell me. Aside from that, let me tell you the author has already admitted that some of her stories are “emotional memory”, (The Guardian” Chinese cast doubt over executive’s rags to riches tale http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/feb/04/ping-fu-book-chinese-critics) what an excuse, LOL

    Geoff on February 1st, 2013 at 12:49 am said:
    Ping is no doubt successful. And the mainstream just loves what she told them… Pick a copy of her book and read. I just found the way she described her China experience is nothing but amusing.

    My comment: I like your comment in the way you said it is “amusing”, however, I was just curious why most (if I am not mistaken) of Westerners and the main stream media choose to believe and love exaggeated stories about China, the dark side of China and prejudice of China? long time media brain washing or think you are superior to Easterners?

    1. Commentor says:

      Quote from Amazon: (I suggest you go there and find more for yourself)
      February 3, 2013
      By Yong (MD. USA)
      Ping is the most honest person i had never seen before. Ping is the person with extraordinary ability, she is and should be a superstar. Ping is an angel.
      I gave this book five-star, but after reading more, I found co-author Meimei Fox made so many mistakes, so I changed the rating to three-star.

      1. Ping is honest.
      Her book reads “My mother and I went to the school and declared I had a mental breakdown so I would not be sent to remote China (page 258).” So, ping HONESTLY told us her mother and she LIED and took advantage of their ability to make up lies 30 years ago. I want to challenge all the reviewers, who can be more honest than Ping?

      Maybe not all the people know the background of it. At that time, Chinese government paid tuition for all the undergraduates. As an undergraduate from a normal university, Ping also got paid a significant amount of stipend. She also enjoy free medical insurance (Totally free, no copay , no deductible ). In return to this, government determined where students work (which Ping Xu got out by making lie).

      Imagine you are a high school student, one company told you if you agree to work for them after graduate from university (You can choose which university, and you know you may be send to remote area), they will pay for your tuition , medical insurance and give stipend to you. You agreed , but after four years in university, you told the company you have mental problems, and get out it free (You do not need to pay back all the money they spend on you). Is it inspiring? I understand why this book is for readers 18 years older. Because they don’t want your kids inspired by Ping’s story.

      2. Ping is the person with extraordinary ability
      Ping only knew a few (if not three) English words before she arrived US . With the knowledge of a few English words, Ping applied many American universities, and was accepted by one . So, ping wrote her personal statement with three words(or a few words), communicated with universities with three words. Ping used a few words to show she was really interested in English, so she was accepted as an English major by University of New Mexico. Having the ability to accomplish that, she was and is a superstar!!!

      3.Meimie Fox’s bad job ruined the book.
      On one page, Chinese government put her in jail while she was still a student. They told her classmate Ping had mental problem, in order to explain why Ping disappeared.
      On the other page, Ping and her mother declared she had mental problem, so she would not be sent to remote China. From here, we can see how amusing Ping was/is and always to be. Ping smartly avoided been sent to remote china as a high school teacher. (She already spend a lot of time in remote China for her research on poor babygirls there. She had deep sympathy towards the people in remote China.)

      Which event happened first? Which event truly happened? If Ping self declared mental problem happened first, then Chinese government did not needed to tell her classmates again later on. If government told Ping’s classmates she had mental problem, she then was told to leave the country quietly, her university would not assign her a job in remote China. Then Ping and her mother did not need to tell the university she had mental problem.

      Meimei should not put those two events all in the book. Apparently, if one event happened, the other event should not happened.

      4. Ping is an angel.
      Ping was kidnapped by a Vietnamese. When three children first meet Ping, their eyes “watery” , they called Ping mother in Chinese(or Vietnamese?). If the children were kept in that condition for a long time, they must be get used to it, they would not cry. Do you ever heard a three or four years old child call other woman mother at first sight? They cried and called out mom only because in front of them were Ping, an angel. Their foot were glued to the floor, because their father do not want them use toilet. They used the room as a toilet, since they can not move around(Don’t tell me they wear diapers, otherwise Ping would remember how dirty the diapers were, how difficult to clean the children). But Ping did not smell anything or noticed anything on the floor when her entered the room, again, because Ping is a angel.

      For the policeman who rescued Ping, there is strong evidence that the Vietnamese man abused children and kidnapped Ping. I am not familiar with the law in US, but I think those are crimes/felony, police could (or even should ) charge the Vietnamese man without Ping’s agreement. But in Ping’s story,the police man had to ask Ping’s agreement. Because they knew Ping is a angel.

      The children were glued to the floor, and Ping forgot to mention how she removed the glue without hurt the children. My dear readers, you may curious about it, or why Ping forgot to mention. My dear readers, remember Ping is an angel, a real angel. Removing the glue is a piece of cake for an angel. Then everything can be explained flawlessly.

      If you read other reviewers comments, you can found more inconsistency in this book.Meimei is the person to blame. Even Meimei messed up a could be perfect, inspiring, and 100 % true story of Ping, my support of Ping is unchanged.

      I am amused and inspired by the book, I am trying to find a better way to call Ping’s true story(memory, fantasy or delusion?). Suggestions are welcomed.

      My dear readers if you have the patience to read my whole review, I strongly suggested you to read Ping’s story. With a little common sense and logic, you can find evidences on every page which support my conclusion Ping is the most honest, Ping is the smartest, Ping is an real angel.

  18. Long Wang says:

    Those men who were raped by Catholic priests were asking for justice even after all these years. If Fu Ping were really gang raped, let’s just assume that something prevented her and her family from pressing charge back then. But what’s stopping them from doing it today? It’s not like it’s so traumatic, shameful that she don’t want to face it, since she was talking about it in public, facing a large audience. It’s not like there were no witness — as she put it, many people knew it happened and knew who did it. And lastly, today’s political climate is no longer that oppressive. Those persecuted during the CR had mostly been exonerated. This was a very serious criminal offense. Those involved were sexual predators, monsters that if still at large, are serious dangers to other people. Beating was widespread during CR as a routine treatment for politically alienated individuals, but gang rape NEVER was. In old Chinese culture, beating the bad guys, or even beating insubordinate children were more or less accepted. The famous “54 movement”, which were acclaimed in China, featured students beating officials. Thus, for the victim of beating, it may be hard to sue their inflictor. But gang rape never share the status of beating, and has always been deemed a heinous crime. If Fu Ping’s story were true, she owe it to herself and the Chinese society to help put those criminals behind bars. Question: Why isn’t she doing it?

  19. Larry Trump says:

    Another amazing story told by Ping, using XBOX Kinect to scan a broken arm.
    – Does she really sound reasonable, even about her technical stuff?
    *************************************************
    Ping Fu of GeoMagic recounted a story in which an employee of her company broke his arm on the way to work. Instead of going to the emergency room, the mathematics whiz showed up at work and used an on-site Xbox Kinect System to scan his injured limb. The scan data was given to one of Geomagic’s designers who literally on the spot designed and 3D printed his coworker a custom cast.
    ************************************************
    ****solidsmack.com/fabrication/the-3d-print-bubble-still-too-early-for-consumers/

  20. Charles cai says:

    If some idiots enjoys being duped , let them do. We should be proud that ping fu, a Chinese woman, can fool so many idiots with her fabricated harsh stories in china. Let them enjoy being fooled. What are we doing here.

  21. [...] Bend Not Break — she had an amazing life but this caught my eye in the Make review: In China, she told me, making and craftsmanship are highly revered, and under Mao, factory jobs were prized. Her experience working in Mao’s factories planted a seed in her mind that sprouted when she sought to create her own company. Rather than launch another internet-based business as was the rage at the time, she wanted to connect software to the physical world. (via Makezine) [...]

  22. [...] month I wrote about Bend, Not Break, a memoir written by Ping Fu. Fu is the founder of Geomagic and now chief strategy officer at 3D [...]

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