During the Middle Ages food was often eaten from trenchers. While later these changed to be made of metal or wood, they were originally a piece of (often stale) bread, cut into a square shape, and used as a plate. At the end of the meal, the trencher could be then be eaten.

The practice of edible tableware hasn’t exactly gone away, from Italian bread bowls to Mexican corn tortilla, but it’s not exactly on the same level as the Piet Zwart Institute‘s Altered Appliances exhibition project. Here the rolling pins aren’t just kitchen implements for rolling dough. They’re design tools; so called “rollware.”

Of course being me, I immediately start to think of other uses. We’ve seen disposable flash drives made from paper before, perhaps we should look into edible flash drives? It would be the ultimate in data security; you could eat your data if you were captured. Sort of like a twenty first century equivalent of rice paper.

(via dornob and yatzer)

Alasdair Allan

Alasdair Allan is a scientist, author, hacker and tinkerer, who is spending a lot of his time thinking about the Internet of Things. In the past he has mesh networked the Moscone Center, caused a U.S. Senate hearing, and contributed to the detection of what was—at the time—the most distant object yet discovered.


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