While World Maker Faire is happening Sept, 21-22 in New York City,  Toronto, Canada’s largest city is once again playing host to a mini maker faire of its own. Artists, hackers, and tinkerers from the greater Toronto Area will be leaving their garages to show off homemade technology and projects.

Toronto will host dozens of talented makers and their projects as well as hands-on workshops and presentations.The Toronto chapter of the Awesome Foundation will also be onsite awarding one amazing pitch of an idea, hack or invention a grant of $1,000.

From old school tech to new age hacks, this year’s makers have a lot to show off. 3D printing will be well represented in everything from jewelry to chocolate. The power of microprocessors will be demonstrated in projects like an Arduino powered foosball scoreboard and a bunch of projects by one very talented 11-year-old. The art of traditional making with a modern twist will be exhibited through glass blowing and leather craftsmanship.

Here is but a sampling of the 2013 makers  coming to the fair:

3D Chocolateering: 3D Chocolate Printing

With the ultimate goal to make 3D printing more accessible to all consumers, 3D Chocolateering continues to push the bounds of what low-cost rapid manufacturing technologies can accomplish. 3D Chocolateering is founded by a small group of Mechatronics Engineering graduates based out of Waterloo, Ontario. 3D Chocolateering has made its entrance by creating the world’s first chocolate selective laser sintering 3D printer that can form solid objects by selectively melting chocolate powder.

Magic Cubes by Ryerson Physics

Magic Cubes are giant interactive Rubik’s Cube-like creations built out of color changing LEDs. Each Arduino-based cube has nine beautifully illuminated square tiles to each of six bright faces. Custom controllers with electronic sensors let audience participants get their hands dirty and play with the cube, rotating faces and planes, homing in on a color coordinated win.

Nudgeables by Social Body Lab

The Nudgeables Accessory Kit is a modular hardware kit for creating paired sets of wireless wearable accessories. A single Nudgeables device employs a pre-configured wireless radio transceiver with a sensor input and an output for a “”notifier”” (actuator). The flexible design allows for you to attach a wide variety of sensors and actuators to the board to create custom sensory and feedback systems. By creatively embedding wireless communication into yours and your friend/partner/colleague’s garments, you are able to secretly “”nudge”” each other at a distance.

Stett Holbrook

Stett Holbrook is editor of the Bohemian, an alternative weekly in Santa Rosa, California. He is a former senior editor at Maker Media.

He is also the co-creator of Food Forward, a documentary TV series for PBS about the innovators and pioneers changing our food system.


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