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Galileo in Shed

Intel first announced the Galileo, a new X86 powered microcontroller, at Maker Faire Rome last October. Developed in collaboration with the Arduino team, the board is based on Intel’s low power Quark SoC X1000 processor and is compatible with current Arduino code and R3 compatible shields. Since the announcement the Galileo has been notoriously hard to get ahold of – which is why we’re happy to announce that we’ve received a limited quantity in the Maker Shed.

Our own Matt Richardson is putting the finishing touches on the Getting Started with Intel Galileo book. It is available for purchase now in pre-release PDF format. This enables you to purchase the PDF now to get started and receive continuous updates until and including the final copy.

Here’s what Matt has to say about his experiences with the Galileo so far:

Intel’s Galileo represents a brand new approach to using Linux and Arduino together. Arduino users will be comfortable with the same code and IDE while Linux hackers can compile their own custom kernel to run on the board. It’s been a pleasure to tinker with Galileo while working on this book. I’m sure we’ll see makers do some amazing things with the board.

If you’re familiar with writing sketches in the Arduino IDE and have a passion for Linux (Galileo’s operating system) you’re going to feel right at home with the Galileo. The board is also loaded with PC industry standard ports such as a mini-PCI Express slot, Ethernet port, MicroSD slot, and an RS-232 serial port. All this functionality makes the Galileo feel like much more than your average microcontroller. In the event we run out, be sure to add your e-mail address to the back in stock request link to be instantly notified when more arrive.

Michael Castor

I am the Evangelist for the Maker Shed. It seems that there is no limit to my making interests. I’m a tinkerer at heart and have a passion for solving problems and figuring out how things work. When not working for Make I can be found falling off my unicycle, running in adverse weather conditions, skiing down the nearest hill, restoring vintage motorcycles, or working on my car.


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