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Join Us for a live faBrickation demo on G+ on Wednesday, Feb. 19!

makey-closed

Our friends over at the Human Computer Interaction Lab at Hasso Plattner Institute in Berlin, Germany made us this awesome Makey robot with movable arms and a rotating head using their soon-to-be released open source faBrikator prototyping software.  For details on how faBrickaton works, check out my interview with Stefanie Mueller and join us for a G+ Hangout on for a live demonstration of faBrickator in action.

makey-open

The team used this STL model of Makey, identified the custom parts in faBrikator and only 3D printed MAKE “M” logo and the joints. If this prototype had been exclusively 3D printed, it would have taken 58 hours and 51 minutes.

By prototyping jointed Makey with faBrickator it took only 5 hours and 42 minutes. If the joints hadn’t worked properly, this approach would save a tremendous amount of time, making many iterations possible in the time it would have taken to print a single completely 3D printed model.

Join us for a live faBrickation demo on G+ on Wednesday, Feb. 19. It is scheduled for 10am PT/1pm ET and the event lists the time as 7pm CT as the faBrickation folks are in Berlin, Germany.

Anna Kaziunas France

Anna Kaziunas France

Editor, Make: Books

She’s very interested in your ideas for practical digital fabrication focused books (anything that turns codes into things), as well as your adventures in synthetic biology, biohacking, personal genomics and programmable materials.

She’s also the Dean of the global Fab Academy program, the co-author of Getting Started with MakerBot, compiled the Make: 3D Printing book and ran Make:’s 2015 and 2014 3D Printer Shootout Weekend testing events.

She likes things that are computer-controlled, parametric, and open source — preferably all three.

Find her on her personal site, Twitter, , and Facebook.