A gold dragon ring, handcrafted by an artisan's metal cast wax sculptures

A gold dragon ring, handcrafted by an artisan’s metal cast wax sculptures

With 3D printing on the rise and at the forefront of most industries technology efforts, it is both refreshing and perplexing to see anything made by hand. Particularly wax sculptures, but here you are, not everyone has lost the romance of hand-crafted artisan processes. In this day and age of zero-crafting skill 3D printing, I admire and respect this wax sculptor for her skill and efforts.

Lost-wax casting is an ancient process that casts a metal sculpture from an original sculpture, typically made of wax or another soft, melt-able material. The oldest lost-wax cast sculpture was found in the Cave of Treasure in Israel, and has been dated back to c. 3700 BC. I find this fascinating! It’s 2014 and we have artists using methods that are over 5700 years old.

Daphna has a flair for creating little animal rings, and starts by creating a sketched drawing, which she then turns into a full 3D wax sculpture, which can be seen below.

Step one.. the shape. Then chip away everything that is not a bulldog

Step one.. the shape. Then chip away everything that is not a bulldog

Artist, Daphna's hand-crafted sculpture of a bulldog

Artist, Daphna’s hand-crafted sculpture of a bulldog

This sculpture is then turned into a ring by casting it with silver, bronze, brass, or gold. The process is called lost-wax casting, since the wax sculpture is lost in the process (i.e. it melts away and metal takes it’s place). The finished product can be seen below from concept, to a full-fledged metal ring. I guess robots will never take over everything, if these artists have something to say about it. See more about this process and a bunch more pictures at Daphna’s gallery.

A finished bulldog ring, created by covering the wax sculpture in silver, brass, bronze, or gold

A finished bulldog ring, created by covering the wax sculpture in silver, brass, bronze, or gold