Keating gives a presentation on how he found his brain tumor

Keating gives a presentation on how he found his brain tumor.

$10M to Carbon3D

Image courtesy of Carbon3D

Image courtesy of Carbon3D

Last week, we featured a University of Buffalo student who printed a 40×40×100mm Eiffel Tower in just over 12 minutes. That same day, VentureBeat reported that Carbon3D — another startup working on speedier 3D printing — received $10M from Autodesk’s 3D printing fund. Carbon3D calls the technology Continuous Liquid Interface Production, and claims a 25- to 100-factor speed increase over more traditional techniques.

Clear the runway

Photograph courtesy of Melinda Looi

Photograph courtesy of Melinda Looi

This Thursday, a 3D printing fashion show opens in New York. The show will highlight a full length evening gown from designer Melinda Looi, designed to flow with a woman’s body and her movements, according to Digital Trends. But don’t expect the dress to hit Target just yet. “Currently accessories and garment accessories are the only commercial way forward, as a complete gown is just too expensive,” Looi told Digital Trends.

Tumor tracking

Keating holds a 3D print of his brain tumor. Photograph by Paula Aguilera and Jonathan William

Keating holds a 3D print of his brain tumor. Photograph by Paula Aguilera and Jonathan William

Back in 2007, MIT graduate student Steven Keating had a a cranial MRI taken as part of a study. They noticed a small abnormality, and he had it scanned again in 2010. Last year, he noticed a phantom vinegar smell and remembering that result, had the area scanned one more time, this time revealing an avocado-sized IDH-1 tumor, which he had removed in a surgical procedure. Keating attributed the success of his surgery to the wealth of access, connections, and data analysis afforded by MIT. At a recent presentation, he passed out 3D printed models of the tumor.

Print with your food

Photograph courtesy of 3D Food Printing Conference

Photograph courtesy of 3D Food Printing Conference

April 21 will mark the beginning of the 3D Food Printing Conference in Venlo, the Netherlands. Topics covered: food components, custom nutrition, processing and design, safety, new value chains, elderly and healthcare applications, hardware and software development, and business models and legal issues.