Program Your Arduino from Your Chromebook

Alasdair Allan

Alasdair Allan is a scientist, author, hacker and tinkerer, who is spending a lot of his time thinking about the Internet of Things. In the past he has mesh networked the Moscone Center, caused a U.S. Senate hearing, and contributed to the detection of what was—at the time—the most distant object yet discovered.

254 Articles

By Alasdair Allan

Alasdair Allan is a scientist, author, hacker and tinkerer, who is spending a lot of his time thinking about the Internet of Things. In the past he has mesh networked the Moscone Center, caused a U.S. Senate hearing, and contributed to the detection of what was—at the time—the most distant object yet discovered.

254 Articles

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Codebender on a Chromebook connected to an Arduino project.

Codebender on a Chromebook connected to an Arduino project.

I own a Chromebook Pixel. It’s light and convenient, and sometimes it can be a lot handier than lugging around a full laptop. However it’s not my main machine, because there are some things it just can’t do.

Programming an Arduino Uno from a Chromebook using Codebender.

Until today one of those things was to program an Arduino board, and as you might imagine that’s something I need to do quite a bit.

Codebender is an online web-based development environment for the Arduino that runs in your browser. It currently supports 82 different Arduino compatible boards out of the box, and from today it also runs on Chromebooks.

Ahead of today’s announcement at MakerCon we talked to Vasilis Georgitzikis — CEO and one of the founders of Codebender — about Codebender and what they had to do to add support for programming the Arduino using a Chromebook.

To get the environment up and running you’ll need to update your Chromebook to v42 if you haven’t already done that and install the new Codebender application. From there it should be more-or-less like using the Arduino IDE on your normal laptop.